2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160845
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Self-Care in Urban African-American Teens with Asthma
Abstract:
Promoting Self-Care in Urban African-American Teens with Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Contact Address:9424 Monticello Avenue, Evanston, IL, 60203, USA
Contact Telephone:847-226-3339
Co-Authors:B. Velsor-Friedrich, L. Militello, R. Conway-Phillips, K. Donley, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL; M. Richards, P. Stevanovic, I. Gross, J. Cunningham, S. Pearce, Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 9 million youth under the age of 17 years. It is responsible for 14 million school absences and $14 billion in health care and lost productivity costs. Asthma disproportionately affects minority populations. Teens with asthma are particularly at risk for poor control of this life threatening disease due to tumultuous changes of adolescence and their feelings of invincibility. Educational materials and programs that specifically target adolescents are virtually non-existent. This study implemented by a multi-disciplinary team, will address these issues by providing a comprehensive asthma program that is developmentally appropriate for urban African-American adolescents with asthma. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory is the guiding framework for this study. The objective is to evaluate the efficacy of the school-based program TEAM (Teen Educational Asthma Management) on: Aim 1- asthma self-care and asthma-related quality of life; and Aim 2 - asthma knowledge, asthma self-efficacy, coping and asthma health outcomes. The TEAM program is composed of: 1) asthma education, 2) coping skills training, and 3) nurse practitioner re-enforcement visits. A total of 134 African-American adolescents with persistent asthma will be enrolled in this NIH funded study. Eight urban high schools with school-based health centers serve as the setting. Two groups, the intervention and control group will be compared at three posttest times: 2, 6, & 12 months. End of program interviews will be conducted with a sub-sample of teens and parents/guardians to explore the experience of the intervention and the potential difference in teens' asthma management strategies. Hierarchial linear regression modeling will be used to test the hypotheses regarding temporal change in outcomes. At the two month follow-up, initial analysis of the preliminary data indicates that students in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvement in the areas of asthma knowledge and asthma self-care. The findings of this study will improve care to an underserved population of African-American teens with asthma and will have significant implications for health care providers, researchers, and policy makers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Self-Care in Urban African-American Teens with Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160845-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Self-Care in Urban African-American Teens with Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9424 Monticello Avenue, Evanston, IL, 60203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847-226-3339</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bvelsor@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Velsor-Friedrich, L. Militello, R. Conway-Phillips, K. Donley, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL; M. Richards, P. Stevanovic, I. Gross, J. Cunningham, S. Pearce, Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 9 million youth under the age of 17 years. It is responsible for 14 million school absences and $14 billion in health care and lost productivity costs. Asthma disproportionately affects minority populations. Teens with asthma are particularly at risk for poor control of this life threatening disease due to tumultuous changes of adolescence and their feelings of invincibility. Educational materials and programs that specifically target adolescents are virtually non-existent. This study implemented by a multi-disciplinary team, will address these issues by providing a comprehensive asthma program that is developmentally appropriate for urban African-American adolescents with asthma. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory is the guiding framework for this study. The objective is to evaluate the efficacy of the school-based program TEAM (Teen Educational Asthma Management) on: Aim 1- asthma self-care and asthma-related quality of life; and Aim 2 - asthma knowledge, asthma self-efficacy, coping and asthma health outcomes. The TEAM program is composed of: 1) asthma education, 2) coping skills training, and 3) nurse practitioner re-enforcement visits. A total of 134 African-American adolescents with persistent asthma will be enrolled in this NIH funded study. Eight urban high schools with school-based health centers serve as the setting. Two groups, the intervention and control group will be compared at three posttest times: 2, 6, &amp; 12 months. End of program interviews will be conducted with a sub-sample of teens and parents/guardians to explore the experience of the intervention and the potential difference in teens' asthma management strategies. Hierarchial linear regression modeling will be used to test the hypotheses regarding temporal change in outcomes. At the two month follow-up, initial analysis of the preliminary data indicates that students in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvement in the areas of asthma knowledge and asthma self-care. The findings of this study will improve care to an underserved population of African-American teens with asthma and will have significant implications for health care providers, researchers, and policy makers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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