2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160848
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Metabolic Syndrome in Prehypertensive Rural Midlife Women
Abstract:
Metabolic Syndrome in Prehypertensive Rural Midlife Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Walker, Susan, EdD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:38 Cottage Cove, Plymouth, MA, 02360-6603, USA
Contact Telephone:(508) 209-0662
Co-Authors:S. Walker, C.H. Pullen, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; P.A. Hageman, Division of Physical Therapy Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; L. Boeckner, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences,
Background: Metabolic syndrome increases risk for morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. It includes at least 3 of 5 criteria in women: waist circumference > 35 inches; triglycerides > 150 mg/dL; HDL cholesterol < 50 mg/dL; blood pressure > 130/85 mm Hg; and fasting serum glucose > 110 mg/dL. Underlying risk factors are overweight/obesity, physical inactivity and an atherogenic diet. Purpose: Describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors among prehypertensive rural midlife women. Conceptual Framework: Health Promotion Model. Participants: 289 prehypertensive rural women aged 40-69 in a Midwestern state, enrolled in a clinical trial to lower blood pressure through activity and diet. Methods: Descriptive design with baseline data. Nurses supervised women in completing computerized established reliable and valid measures of physical activity and healthy eating and assessed biomarkers. Eating and activity were measured by behavioral self-report (Block food frequency questionnaire and 7-Day Activity Recall) and biomarkers (waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting serum lipids and glucose). Results: 80 (27.7 %) of women in the clinical trial met 3 or more of the 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome; 55 met 3 criteria, 20 met 4 criteria and 5 met all 5 criteria. Among those 80 women, 78 (97.5 %) had high waist circumference; 67 (83.8 %) had low HDL; 62 (77.5 %) had high triglycerides; 54 (67.5 %) had elevated blood pressure; and 9 (11.3 %) had high fasting serum glucose. The overweight/obesity risk factor was evidenced by BMI > 24.9 (M = 32.4, SD = 4.46). Physical inactivity was evidenced by engagement in 30 or more minutes of moderate or greater intensity activity on less than 1 day per week (M = 0.03, SD = 0.22). Atherogenic diet was evidenced by % Kcal from fat intake (M = 37.5, SD = 5.75) above the recommended 20-35 %, and % Kcal from saturated fat intake (M = 11.2, SD = 2.19) above the recommended less than 10 %. Discussion: Lifestyle modification is first-line therapy for the management of metabolic syndrome components. Participation in this year-long clinical trial of lifestyle change to lower blood pressure should reduce the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among these women. Funded by NINR Grant No. 2 R01 NR04861
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMetabolic Syndrome in Prehypertensive Rural Midlife Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160848-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Metabolic Syndrome in Prehypertensive Rural Midlife Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walker, Susan, EdD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">38 Cottage Cove, Plymouth, MA, 02360-6603, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(508) 209-0662</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">swalker@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Walker, C.H. Pullen, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; P.A. Hageman, Division of Physical Therapy Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; L. Boeckner, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Metabolic syndrome increases risk for morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. It includes at least 3 of 5 criteria in women: waist circumference &gt; 35 inches; triglycerides &gt; 150 mg/dL; HDL cholesterol &lt; 50 mg/dL; blood pressure &gt; 130/85 mm Hg; and fasting serum glucose &gt; 110 mg/dL. Underlying risk factors are overweight/obesity, physical inactivity and an atherogenic diet. Purpose: Describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors among prehypertensive rural midlife women. Conceptual Framework: Health Promotion Model. Participants: 289 prehypertensive rural women aged 40-69 in a Midwestern state, enrolled in a clinical trial to lower blood pressure through activity and diet. Methods: Descriptive design with baseline data. Nurses supervised women in completing computerized established reliable and valid measures of physical activity and healthy eating and assessed biomarkers. Eating and activity were measured by behavioral self-report (Block food frequency questionnaire and 7-Day Activity Recall) and biomarkers (waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting serum lipids and glucose). Results: 80 (27.7 %) of women in the clinical trial met 3 or more of the 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome; 55 met 3 criteria, 20 met 4 criteria and 5 met all 5 criteria. Among those 80 women, 78 (97.5 %) had high waist circumference; 67 (83.8 %) had low HDL; 62 (77.5 %) had high triglycerides; 54 (67.5 %) had elevated blood pressure; and 9 (11.3 %) had high fasting serum glucose. The overweight/obesity risk factor was evidenced by BMI &gt; 24.9 (M = 32.4, SD = 4.46). Physical inactivity was evidenced by engagement in 30 or more minutes of moderate or greater intensity activity on less than 1 day per week (M = 0.03, SD = 0.22). Atherogenic diet was evidenced by % Kcal from fat intake (M = 37.5, SD = 5.75) above the recommended 20-35 %, and % Kcal from saturated fat intake (M = 11.2, SD = 2.19) above the recommended less than 10 %. Discussion: Lifestyle modification is first-line therapy for the management of metabolic syndrome components. Participation in this year-long clinical trial of lifestyle change to lower blood pressure should reduce the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among these women. Funded by NINR Grant No. 2 R01 NR04861</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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