Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding: Native American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160849
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding: Native American Women
Abstract:
Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding: Native American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wilhelm, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UNMC
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:4502 Ave I, Scottsbluff, NE, 69361, USA
Contact Telephone:308-632-0412
Co-Authors:S. Wilhelm, T. Rodehorst-Weber, T. Aguirre, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Scottsbluff, NE; M. Stepans, Education Compliance, Wyoming State Board of Nursing, Cheyenne, WY;
Purpose: Native American women initiate and sustain breastfeeding for a shorter period of time than Caucasians, Hispanics, and African Americans. This pilot study explored the feasibility of using Motivational Interviewing to promote sustained breastfeeding by increasing a Native American mother's intention to breastfeed for six months and increasing breastfeeding self-efficacy. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual model was based on the theoretical under-pinning of Motivational interviewing [MI], the combined adaption of the Transtheoretical model [TTM] and Ajzen's theory of planned behavior [TPB] which explains an individual's success at behavior performance. MI proposes to decrease ambivalence by using a client-centered approach that may increase breastfeeding self-efficacy, increase perceived importance and intention to sustain breastfeeding. Design: A longitudinal experimental repeated measures two-group design was selected to explore the feasibility of using MI to promote sustained breastfeeding compared with an infant safety attention group. A convenience sample of 12 breastfeeding mothers, > 15 years of age was randomized according to the Tribal community where they resided. Analysis: Mothers in the intervention group (n=8) demonstrate a trend towards more days of breastfeeding, M=142.5 (SD=58), range 60-184 days, compared with the infant safety attention intervention group, M=21.25 (SD=16.5), range 9-45 days. Finally breastfeeding self-efficacy was also similar with the MI group, M=59.75 (SD=7.3), compared with the attention group, M=56.57 (SD=12.75), range 39-70. Interpretation: Because of the small sample size, the intervention requires testing in a larger fully powered study before it is implemented on a larger scale. However, MI appears to be a useful strategy to promote breastfeeding in Native American women. Relevance: Since this population's rates are well below the national rate, developing interventions that help promote breastfeeding are critical.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding: Native American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160849-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding: Native American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilhelm, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNMC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4502 Ave I, Scottsbluff, NE, 69361, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">308-632-0412</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slwilhel@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Wilhelm, T. Rodehorst-Weber, T. Aguirre, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Scottsbluff, NE; M. Stepans, Education Compliance, Wyoming State Board of Nursing, Cheyenne, WY;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Native American women initiate and sustain breastfeeding for a shorter period of time than Caucasians, Hispanics, and African Americans. This pilot study explored the feasibility of using Motivational Interviewing to promote sustained breastfeeding by increasing a Native American mother's intention to breastfeed for six months and increasing breastfeeding self-efficacy. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual model was based on the theoretical under-pinning of Motivational interviewing [MI], the combined adaption of the Transtheoretical model [TTM] and Ajzen's theory of planned behavior [TPB] which explains an individual's success at behavior performance. MI proposes to decrease ambivalence by using a client-centered approach that may increase breastfeeding self-efficacy, increase perceived importance and intention to sustain breastfeeding. Design: A longitudinal experimental repeated measures two-group design was selected to explore the feasibility of using MI to promote sustained breastfeeding compared with an infant safety attention group. A convenience sample of 12 breastfeeding mothers, &gt; 15 years of age was randomized according to the Tribal community where they resided. Analysis: Mothers in the intervention group (n=8) demonstrate a trend towards more days of breastfeeding, M=142.5 (SD=58), range 60-184 days, compared with the infant safety attention intervention group, M=21.25 (SD=16.5), range 9-45 days. Finally breastfeeding self-efficacy was also similar with the MI group, M=59.75 (SD=7.3), compared with the attention group, M=56.57 (SD=12.75), range 39-70. Interpretation: Because of the small sample size, the intervention requires testing in a larger fully powered study before it is implemented on a larger scale. However, MI appears to be a useful strategy to promote breastfeeding in Native American women. Relevance: Since this population's rates are well below the national rate, developing interventions that help promote breastfeeding are critical.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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