Pain Barriers: Psychometrics of a 13-Item Questionnaire and Comparisons in Cancer and Sickle Cell Samples

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160850
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Barriers: Psychometrics of a 13-Item Questionnaire and Comparisons in Cancer and Sickle Cell Samples
Abstract:
Pain Barriers: Psychometrics of a 13-Item Questionnaire and Comparisons in Cancer and Sickle Cell Samples
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wilkie, Diana, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UIC
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-5469
Co-Authors:D.J. Wilkie, D. Boyd-Seale, Y.O. Kim, M.L. Suarez, H. Lee, H. Wittert, Z. Zhao, S. Zong, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; M. Robert, Z.J. Wang, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Problem: Ward's pain Barriers Questionnaire (BQ-27), a 27-item, 8 domain tool, is widely used to measure patients' beliefs about pain, but it includes redundant items with resultant respondent burden. Aim: In a series of studies (3 cancer, 1 sickle cell), we aimed to eliminate the redundancy of the BQ-27, retain its theoretical domains, maintain psychometric properties of a new shortened version, and compare its sensitivity within and between samples. Methods: Based on 259 cancer patients' data, we reduced the BQ-27 to 13 items by selecting the single item from each domain with the highest frequency of endorsement and including all side effect items. We tested BQ-13 reliability in two studies (N=221, N=167), and determined instrument sensitivity using ANCOVA (N=221) within a cancer sample, and ANOVAs between the three samples. Results: The BQ-13 included items from all 8 domains and demonstrated internal consistency (alphas=.73-.83) and 4-week stability (r=.59-.74). It was sensitive (F(1,218)=7.7, p=.006) to effects of a tailored, multimedia educational intervention (control mean=1.65(.99) pre-intervention, 1.69(1) post-intervention); experimental mean=1.9(.94) pre-intervention, 1.6(.95) post-intervention). It also was sensitive to differences in barriers between samples (F(2, 491) 20.5, p<000). Pairwise comparisons revealed that the cancer sample (3% African American [AA]) had a lower mean BQ-13 score (1.8(.98) than the cancer sample that was 65% AA (2.4(.95) but that BQ-13 mean scores for the 65% AA cancer sample and 99% AA sickle cell sample, 2.4(.95) and 2.2(.96), respectively, were not significantly different. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the BQ-13 retained domains, eliminated redundant items likely to contribute to floor effects, maintained adequate internal consistency and stability reliability, and had sensitivity to intervention effects and sample differences. Comparability of the BQ-13 to Ward's 8-item tool or Well's 17-item tool requires additional testing, especially in AA samples.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Barriers: Psychometrics of a 13-Item Questionnaire and Comparisons in Cancer and Sickle Cell Samplesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160850-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Barriers: Psychometrics of a 13-Item Questionnaire and Comparisons in Cancer and Sickle Cell Samples</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkie, Diana, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UIC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-5469</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diwilkie@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.J. Wilkie, D. Boyd-Seale, Y.O. Kim, M.L. Suarez, H. Lee, H. Wittert, Z. Zhao, S. Zong, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; M. Robert, Z.J. Wang, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Ward's pain Barriers Questionnaire (BQ-27), a 27-item, 8 domain tool, is widely used to measure patients' beliefs about pain, but it includes redundant items with resultant respondent burden. Aim: In a series of studies (3 cancer, 1 sickle cell), we aimed to eliminate the redundancy of the BQ-27, retain its theoretical domains, maintain psychometric properties of a new shortened version, and compare its sensitivity within and between samples. Methods: Based on 259 cancer patients' data, we reduced the BQ-27 to 13 items by selecting the single item from each domain with the highest frequency of endorsement and including all side effect items. We tested BQ-13 reliability in two studies (N=221, N=167), and determined instrument sensitivity using ANCOVA (N=221) within a cancer sample, and ANOVAs between the three samples. Results: The BQ-13 included items from all 8 domains and demonstrated internal consistency (alphas=.73-.83) and 4-week stability (r=.59-.74). It was sensitive (F(1,218)=7.7, p=.006) to effects of a tailored, multimedia educational intervention (control mean=1.65(.99) pre-intervention, 1.69(1) post-intervention); experimental mean=1.9(.94) pre-intervention, 1.6(.95) post-intervention). It also was sensitive to differences in barriers between samples (F(2, 491) 20.5, p&lt;000). Pairwise comparisons revealed that the cancer sample (3% African American [AA]) had a lower mean BQ-13 score (1.8(.98) than the cancer sample that was 65% AA (2.4(.95) but that BQ-13 mean scores for the 65% AA cancer sample and 99% AA sickle cell sample, 2.4(.95) and 2.2(.96), respectively, were not significantly different. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the BQ-13 retained domains, eliminated redundant items likely to contribute to floor effects, maintained adequate internal consistency and stability reliability, and had sensitivity to intervention effects and sample differences. Comparability of the BQ-13 to Ward's 8-item tool or Well's 17-item tool requires additional testing, especially in AA samples.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.