2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160857
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiving appraisal: Caregivers of ventilated individuals
Abstract:
Caregiving appraisal: Caregivers of ventilated individuals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Findeis, Anne, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois
Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing
Title:Clinical Instructor
Contact Address:MC802 Box 6998, Chicago, IL, 60680, USA
Contact Telephone:3124130133
This exploratory study described the effects of caregiving on 12 family members who cared for ventilator assisted individuals. We measured: caregiving burden, impact, mastery, and satisfaction; caregiving tasks, social support, and adjustment. Data were collected using the Caregiving Appraisal Scale (CAS) (Lawton et al., 1989) and a semi-structured interview. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative research techniques. CAS scores ranged from l to 5; lower scores reflect more burden, more impact, less satisfaction, and less mastery and are reported as means (SD): Burden 3.59 (0.64), Impact 3.98 (0.65), Mastery 4.14 (0.50), Satisfaction 3.93 (0.57). Most caregivers (67%) felt they adjusted well despite many problems. Problems with home nurses, equipment suppliers and insurance were frustrating, time consuming and costly. Caregivers felt they lacked the information to coordinate and manage these services. Adjustment was enhanced by family support, past caregiving experience, getting used to caregiving, and having enough time to provide care. As a result of caregiving, caregivers experienced: changes in relationships, limited social and travel opportunities, loss of sleep, and financial worry.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiving appraisal: Caregivers of ventilated individualsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160857-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caregiving appraisal: Caregivers of ventilated individuals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Findeis, Anne, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois<br/>Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MC802 Box 6998, Chicago, IL, 60680, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3124130133</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This exploratory study described the effects of caregiving on 12 family members who cared for ventilator assisted individuals. We measured: caregiving burden, impact, mastery, and satisfaction; caregiving tasks, social support, and adjustment. Data were collected using the Caregiving Appraisal Scale (CAS) (Lawton et al., 1989) and a semi-structured interview. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative research techniques. CAS scores ranged from l to 5; lower scores reflect more burden, more impact, less satisfaction, and less mastery and are reported as means (SD): Burden 3.59 (0.64), Impact 3.98 (0.65), Mastery 4.14 (0.50), Satisfaction 3.93 (0.57). Most caregivers (67%) felt they adjusted well despite many problems. Problems with home nurses, equipment suppliers and insurance were frustrating, time consuming and costly. Caregivers felt they lacked the information to coordinate and manage these services. Adjustment was enhanced by family support, past caregiving experience, getting used to caregiving, and having enough time to provide care. As a result of caregiving, caregivers experienced: changes in relationships, limited social and travel opportunities, loss of sleep, and financial worry.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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