2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160860
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of parent involvement in preschool drug prevention
Abstract:
Impact of parent involvement in preschool drug prevention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Hahn, Ellen, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of KentuckyCollege of Nursing
Title:Full-time Doctoral Student
Contact Address:#SLC/CON 433B, Lexington, KY, 40536-0232, USA
Contact Telephone:6062572358
Preschool children are increasingly aware of alcohol and other drugs. Parental involvement in age-appropriate prevention programs must begin in the preschool years. The purpose of this study was to document the impact of different levels of parent participation with their preschool children in BABES (Beginning Alcohol and Addictions Basic Education Studies) on (a) parental attitudes and (b) preschoolers' knowledge and attitudes toward alcohol and other drugs. Using Barnard's Child Health Assessment Interaction Model, the study was a quasi-experimental design with a self-selected sample of 28 parents and 37 preschoolers from two Head Start centers. Preschoolers whose parents participated at the high level (3-7 lessons) gained significantly more knowledge than did those whose parents attended at the low level (0-2 lessons) (F=11.22, p <=.00). All parents became more supportive of prevention programs with preschool children at posttest (F=5.87, p <=.03). Nonsmokers participated more often in BABES (Chi-Square=7.42, p <=.01) and viewed themselves more as role models for their children (t=-2.211, p <=.03) than did smokers. This study supports the active involvement of low income parents in alcohol and other drug prevention. Nurses must consider parents' tobacco use when planning and implementing parenting education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of parent involvement in preschool drug preventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160860-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of parent involvement in preschool drug prevention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hahn, Ellen, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of KentuckyCollege of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Full-time Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">#SLC/CON 433B, Lexington, KY, 40536-0232, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6062572358</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ejhahn00@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Preschool children are increasingly aware of alcohol and other drugs. Parental involvement in age-appropriate prevention programs must begin in the preschool years. The purpose of this study was to document the impact of different levels of parent participation with their preschool children in BABES (Beginning Alcohol and Addictions Basic Education Studies) on (a) parental attitudes and (b) preschoolers' knowledge and attitudes toward alcohol and other drugs. Using Barnard's Child Health Assessment Interaction Model, the study was a quasi-experimental design with a self-selected sample of 28 parents and 37 preschoolers from two Head Start centers. Preschoolers whose parents participated at the high level (3-7 lessons) gained significantly more knowledge than did those whose parents attended at the low level (0-2 lessons) (F=11.22, p &lt;=.00). All parents became more supportive of prevention programs with preschool children at posttest (F=5.87, p &lt;=.03). Nonsmokers participated more often in BABES (Chi-Square=7.42, p &lt;=.01) and viewed themselves more as role models for their children (t=-2.211, p &lt;=.03) than did smokers. This study supports the active involvement of low income parents in alcohol and other drug prevention. Nurses must consider parents' tobacco use when planning and implementing parenting education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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