2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160866
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and magnesium status in college women
Abstract:
Stress and magnesium status in college women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Davis, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:ML038, Cincinnati, OH, 452210038, USA
Contact Telephone:5135585280
Behavioral symptoms of a chronic magnesium (Mg) insufficiency are

similar to those of a stress response. Stress promotes a

negative Mg balance and most women do not consume adequate

amounts of Mg. Although plasma Mg is maintained within normal

limits, a chronic marginal consumption of Mg may leave slowly

exchanging body stores depleted. Thus, when exposed to stress,

the physiological adaptive potential of the person is limited and

symptoms of a Mg insufficiency are manifested as a stress

response. The purpose of this study was to examine the

relationships among dietary Mg, perceived stress, plasma Mg and

symptoms of stress. Eighty healthy women, aged 18-35, not taking

medications, birth control pills or nutrient supplements were

selected. The Symptoms of Stress Inventory, the Cohen Perceived

Stress Scale, two 3-day diet records, and blood samples were

collected. Blood was collected during menstruation to control

for cycle variation. There was a significant (p<.05) positive

correlation of perceived stress with plasma Mg and symptoms of

stress, and a significant positive correlation of plasma Mg with

symptoms of stress. As expected, diet was not correlated with

plasma Mg, but consumption was lower than the 280 mg RDA, giving

indirect evidence that Mg stores may be compromised. Results

support the hypothesis that perceived stress results in a Mg

shift from cell to plasma, and that higher plasma Mg is

associated with symptoms of a chronic magnesium insufficiency.

Thus the total body Mg status may be a important moderator of the

stress response.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and magnesium status in college womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160866-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and magnesium status in college women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati<br/>School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">ML038, Cincinnati, OH, 452210038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5135585280</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Behavioral symptoms of a chronic magnesium (Mg) insufficiency are<br/><br/>similar to those of a stress response. Stress promotes a<br/><br/>negative Mg balance and most women do not consume adequate<br/><br/>amounts of Mg. Although plasma Mg is maintained within normal<br/><br/>limits, a chronic marginal consumption of Mg may leave slowly<br/><br/>exchanging body stores depleted. Thus, when exposed to stress,<br/><br/>the physiological adaptive potential of the person is limited and<br/><br/>symptoms of a Mg insufficiency are manifested as a stress<br/><br/>response. The purpose of this study was to examine the<br/><br/>relationships among dietary Mg, perceived stress, plasma Mg and<br/><br/>symptoms of stress. Eighty healthy women, aged 18-35, not taking<br/><br/>medications, birth control pills or nutrient supplements were<br/><br/>selected. The Symptoms of Stress Inventory, the Cohen Perceived<br/><br/>Stress Scale, two 3-day diet records, and blood samples were<br/><br/>collected. Blood was collected during menstruation to control<br/><br/>for cycle variation. There was a significant (p&lt;.05) positive<br/><br/>correlation of perceived stress with plasma Mg and symptoms of<br/><br/>stress, and a significant positive correlation of plasma Mg with<br/><br/>symptoms of stress. As expected, diet was not correlated with<br/><br/>plasma Mg, but consumption was lower than the 280 mg RDA, giving<br/><br/>indirect evidence that Mg stores may be compromised. Results<br/><br/>support the hypothesis that perceived stress results in a Mg<br/><br/>shift from cell to plasma, and that higher plasma Mg is<br/><br/>associated with symptoms of a chronic magnesium insufficiency.<br/><br/>Thus the total body Mg status may be a important moderator of the<br/><br/>stress response.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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