2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160867
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical judgment tasks and task characteristics in psychiatric nursing
Abstract:
Clinical judgment tasks and task characteristics in psychiatric nursing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Regan-Kubinski, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:414 Victoria Bldg., Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Contact Telephone:4126241904
A description of the nature of judgment tasks is fundamental to the

documentation of the processes and the results of clinical

judgment. To date investigations of judgment in nursing have used

laboratory settings or case simulations, methods which

investigators agree fail to capture the complexity of nursing

judgments. In the present study, grounded theory methods were used

to develop a theoretical model of clinical judgment and to provide

a description of judgment tasks and task characteristics across

three psychiatric nursing settings. Fifteen nurses with varied

educational preparation and experience in psychiatric mental health

nursing provided 36 in-depth interviews. Comparative content

analysis was used to determine the underlying structure of the

judgmental tasks and their identifiable characteristics. Findings

suggest that nursing judgment tasks are highly context-dependent;

vary according to practice setting as well as on the basis of

individual clients; and are both diagnostic and prognostic in

nature. Hypotheses generated from the data suggest that despite

the wide range of judgmental tasks in the clinical setting, there

is an underlying structure that forms the basis for nursing

judgments. Further suggested is that qualitative methods are

valuable in documentation of clinical practice and provide the

potential for analysis of judgmental tasks upon which models for

assessment and decision support grounded in clinical practice can

be developed.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical judgment tasks and task characteristics in psychiatric nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160867-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical judgment tasks and task characteristics in psychiatric nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Regan-Kubinski, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">414 Victoria Bldg., Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4126241904</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A description of the nature of judgment tasks is fundamental to the<br/><br/>documentation of the processes and the results of clinical<br/><br/>judgment. To date investigations of judgment in nursing have used<br/><br/>laboratory settings or case simulations, methods which<br/><br/>investigators agree fail to capture the complexity of nursing<br/><br/>judgments. In the present study, grounded theory methods were used<br/><br/>to develop a theoretical model of clinical judgment and to provide<br/><br/>a description of judgment tasks and task characteristics across<br/><br/>three psychiatric nursing settings. Fifteen nurses with varied<br/><br/>educational preparation and experience in psychiatric mental health<br/><br/>nursing provided 36 in-depth interviews. Comparative content<br/><br/>analysis was used to determine the underlying structure of the<br/><br/>judgmental tasks and their identifiable characteristics. Findings<br/><br/>suggest that nursing judgment tasks are highly context-dependent;<br/><br/>vary according to practice setting as well as on the basis of<br/><br/>individual clients; and are both diagnostic and prognostic in<br/><br/>nature. Hypotheses generated from the data suggest that despite<br/><br/>the wide range of judgmental tasks in the clinical setting, there<br/><br/>is an underlying structure that forms the basis for nursing<br/><br/>judgments. Further suggested is that qualitative methods are<br/><br/>valuable in documentation of clinical practice and provide the<br/><br/>potential for analysis of judgmental tasks upon which models for<br/><br/>assessment and decision support grounded in clinical practice can<br/><br/>be developed.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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