2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160868
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age, trust, life events, boundaries, and social skills: A path analysis (DISS)
Abstract:
Age, trust, life events, boundaries, and social skills: A path analysis (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Scott, Anne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Georgia
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing University of Georgia PO Box 30460, Statesboro, GA, 30460, USA
Contact Telephone:9126815739
Nurses interact with people and therefore deal with personal

boundaries daily. The purpose of this study was to test the

relationship and predictive power of seven variables in a

recursive model of boundaries. This exploratory descriptive

study used a path analysis design with a survey technique. The

non-random convenience sample of 145 adults 18 to 77 was

demographically diverse. Data was analyzed using hierarchical

regression with an alpha of .10 as the criteria for retention of

beta weights in the model. The final respecified model indicated

that trust leads to open boundaries (p<.lO) and a lack of trust

leads to closed boundaries (p<.10). Open boundaries lead to good

social skills (p<.001) and aging leads to poor social skills

(p<.10). This study implied that nurses should avoid generalizing

older people as less trusting, less flexible, or less open. The

study reinforced that trust is a prerequisite for open

relationships and open boundaries are a prerequisite for social

skills. Neither trust nor life events were predictive of good

social skills. Although the social skills of the older client

may be poorer, the elderly person is not intentionally closing

his or her boundaries.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge, trust, life events, boundaries, and social skills: A path analysis (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160868-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Age, trust, life events, boundaries, and social skills: A path analysis (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scott, Anne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing University of Georgia PO Box 30460, Statesboro, GA, 30460, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9126815739</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses interact with people and therefore deal with personal<br/><br/>boundaries daily. The purpose of this study was to test the<br/><br/>relationship and predictive power of seven variables in a<br/><br/>recursive model of boundaries. This exploratory descriptive<br/><br/>study used a path analysis design with a survey technique. The<br/><br/>non-random convenience sample of 145 adults 18 to 77 was<br/><br/>demographically diverse. Data was analyzed using hierarchical<br/><br/>regression with an alpha of .10 as the criteria for retention of<br/><br/>beta weights in the model. The final respecified model indicated<br/><br/>that trust leads to open boundaries (p&lt;.lO) and a lack of trust<br/><br/>leads to closed boundaries (p&lt;.10). Open boundaries lead to good<br/><br/>social skills (p&lt;.001) and aging leads to poor social skills<br/><br/>(p&lt;.10). This study implied that nurses should avoid generalizing<br/><br/>older people as less trusting, less flexible, or less open. The<br/><br/>study reinforced that trust is a prerequisite for open<br/><br/>relationships and open boundaries are a prerequisite for social<br/><br/>skills. Neither trust nor life events were predictive of good<br/><br/>social skills. Although the social skills of the older client<br/><br/>may be poorer, the elderly person is not intentionally closing<br/><br/>his or her boundaries.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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