Depressive symptoms after mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI): Impact of pre- and post-injury chronic stress, interpersonal, relatedness, and cognitive burden among community-dwelling survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160870
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressive symptoms after mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI): Impact of pre- and post-injury chronic stress, interpersonal, relatedness, and cognitive burden among community-dwelling survivors
Abstract:
Depressive symptoms after mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI): Impact of pre- and post-injury chronic stress, interpersonal, relatedness, and cognitive burden among community-dwelling survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Bay, Esther
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:248.363.5351
Depressive symptoms, the most common mood disorder after moderate and severe TBI and problematic after mild injury, reduces motivation to participate in needed therapies and contributes to relationship difficulties. Presently, investigators report that biological factors explain early post-TBI depression, while psychosocial factors impact depression developing during the later first year. None have published studies which examine stress-diathesis or human relatedness theory. Specifically, this study examined the contribution of pre and post injury chronic stress, social support, sense of belonging and cognitive burden on survivors with and without depressive symptoms, which was quantified with three measures, one being the Neurobehavioral Function Inventory (NFI), an instrument validated with TBI survivors. 75 mild-moderately injured TBI survivors within 2 years of injury who were admitted to a community rehabilitation program participated in this cross-sectional study. Female survivors were equally represented. Those with depressive symptoms had significantly greater pre-injury stress scores (childhood adversity and stressful life events frequencies), significantly greater post-injury stress reports, significantly lower levels of social support and sense of belonging and reported greater pain intensity. Linear regression analysis and ANCOVA are currently being examined. These results suggest relationships between pre- and post-injury stress, human relatedness and post-TBI depressive symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressive symptoms after mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI): Impact of pre- and post-injury chronic stress, interpersonal, relatedness, and cognitive burden among community-dwelling survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160870-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depressive symptoms after mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI): Impact of pre- and post-injury chronic stress, interpersonal, relatedness, and cognitive burden among community-dwelling survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bay, Esther</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248.363.5351</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pdq@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depressive symptoms, the most common mood disorder after moderate and severe TBI and problematic after mild injury, reduces motivation to participate in needed therapies and contributes to relationship difficulties. Presently, investigators report that biological factors explain early post-TBI depression, while psychosocial factors impact depression developing during the later first year. None have published studies which examine stress-diathesis or human relatedness theory. Specifically, this study examined the contribution of pre and post injury chronic stress, social support, sense of belonging and cognitive burden on survivors with and without depressive symptoms, which was quantified with three measures, one being the Neurobehavioral Function Inventory (NFI), an instrument validated with TBI survivors. 75 mild-moderately injured TBI survivors within 2 years of injury who were admitted to a community rehabilitation program participated in this cross-sectional study. Female survivors were equally represented. Those with depressive symptoms had significantly greater pre-injury stress scores (childhood adversity and stressful life events frequencies), significantly greater post-injury stress reports, significantly lower levels of social support and sense of belonging and reported greater pain intensity. Linear regression analysis and ANCOVA are currently being examined. These results suggest relationships between pre- and post-injury stress, human relatedness and post-TBI depressive symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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