2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160872
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using standardized patients to assess BSN nursing students’ skill competencies
Abstract:
Using standardized patients to assess BSN nursing students’ skill competencies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Jeffries, Pamela
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 418, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.274.8092
The purpose of this study was to describe one BSN program's use of standardized patients as a means of assessing the beginning clinical skills of baccalaureate nursing students and to report student satisfaction with this method. Interaactive stations were designed using simulated patients requiring the student to perform these skills. Paid surrogates were trained to portray patients in standardized roles depicting common general practice situations that would require students to perform particular basic skills. The "patients" evaluated the students using a detailed skills checklist developed to increase inter-rater reliability and decrease biased evaluations. The 59 baccalaureat nursing students tested in this manner expressed high satisfaction, with 71% of the learners being satisfied overall and 20% very satisfied with this assessment method. Using standardized patients: 1) encouraged practicing of basic skills prior to the examination, 2) allowed performance of basic nursing skills at a relatively high level, and 3) provided relatively realistic test settings that were more comparable to real-life situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing standardized patients to assess BSN nursing students’ skill competenciesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160872-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using standardized patients to assess BSN nursing students’ skill competencies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jeffries, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 418, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.274.8092</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prjeffri@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to describe one BSN program's use of standardized patients as a means of assessing the beginning clinical skills of baccalaureate nursing students and to report student satisfaction with this method. Interaactive stations were designed using simulated patients requiring the student to perform these skills. Paid surrogates were trained to portray patients in standardized roles depicting common general practice situations that would require students to perform particular basic skills. The "patients" evaluated the students using a detailed skills checklist developed to increase inter-rater reliability and decrease biased evaluations. The 59 baccalaureat nursing students tested in this manner expressed high satisfaction, with 71% of the learners being satisfied overall and 20% very satisfied with this assessment method. Using standardized patients: 1) encouraged practicing of basic skills prior to the examination, 2) allowed performance of basic nursing skills at a relatively high level, and 3) provided relatively realistic test settings that were more comparable to real-life situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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