2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160874
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of gender on self-care behaviors of elders
Abstract:
Influence of gender on self-care behaviors of elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Jirovec, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 306 Cohn 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.8300
As the elderly population grows, a better understanding of elders’ perceptions of things that foster and hinder their self-care and their self-care behaviors is increasingly important. The study examined elders’ self-care behaviors and gender differences in behaviors of 96 elders living in the community. Participants at senior centers in urban and suburban settings were asked to complete a questionnaire measuring their perceptions of their health promotion behaviors and medical self-care behaviors as well as demographic questions. Women had significantly greater confidence in their ability to provide self-care than did men, although both scored high in their perceptions of their abilities. Women were more confident in starting a new program or not needing to worry about little pains. Both men and women were tempted to go off diets, men by other people and women by the presence of food. Men and women did not differ in health promotion behaviors. Women were more likely to be taking vitamins, while men were more inclined to seek professional help for problems or use drugs previously prescribed by their doctor. The specific health promotion behaviors in which elder men and women engage are described. The implications of gender differences in working with elders are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluence of gender on self-care behaviors of eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160874-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Influence of gender on self-care behaviors of elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jirovec, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 306 Cohn 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.8300</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m.jirovec@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the elderly population grows, a better understanding of elders&rsquo; perceptions of things that foster and hinder their self-care and their self-care behaviors is increasingly important. The study examined elders&rsquo; self-care behaviors and gender differences in behaviors of 96 elders living in the community. Participants at senior centers in urban and suburban settings were asked to complete a questionnaire measuring their perceptions of their health promotion behaviors and medical self-care behaviors as well as demographic questions. Women had significantly greater confidence in their ability to provide self-care than did men, although both scored high in their perceptions of their abilities. Women were more confident in starting a new program or not needing to worry about little pains. Both men and women were tempted to go off diets, men by other people and women by the presence of food. Men and women did not differ in health promotion behaviors. Women were more likely to be taking vitamins, while men were more inclined to seek professional help for problems or use drugs previously prescribed by their doctor. The specific health promotion behaviors in which elder men and women engage are described. The implications of gender differences in working with elders are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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