2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160875
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mini mental status exam: Use with minority elders
Abstract:
Mini mental status exam: Use with minority elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Johnson, Rebecca
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing S413 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.884.4686
The Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) is one of the most widely used research instruments to ascertain the cognitive status of subjects. Commonly MMSE scores are used to determine subject eligibility for participation in studies. The instrument has been reported by multiple authors to be reliable and valid. The issue of whether the reliability and validity holds for use with minority elders is less clear. In the present study, the MMSE was used with urban dwelling African American, Caucasian and Latino elders to ascertain their eligibility to complete a further battery of instruments as part of a larger study. Despite the fact that they were alert, oriented and quite capable of expressing themselves coherently, African American elders had difficulty completing several of the tasks asked of them in the MMSE. These difficulties, will be described and placed within the context of existing literature. The issue of education level will be discussed as a potential confounder of an ethnic elder's ability to score well on the MMSE.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMini mental status exam: Use with minority eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160875-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mini mental status exam: Use with minority elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Rebecca</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing S413 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.884.4686</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RAJohnson@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) is one of the most widely used research instruments to ascertain the cognitive status of subjects. Commonly MMSE scores are used to determine subject eligibility for participation in studies. The instrument has been reported by multiple authors to be reliable and valid. The issue of whether the reliability and validity holds for use with minority elders is less clear. In the present study, the MMSE was used with urban dwelling African American, Caucasian and Latino elders to ascertain their eligibility to complete a further battery of instruments as part of a larger study. Despite the fact that they were alert, oriented and quite capable of expressing themselves coherently, African American elders had difficulty completing several of the tasks asked of them in the MMSE. These difficulties, will be described and placed within the context of existing literature. The issue of education level will be discussed as a potential confounder of an ethnic elder's ability to score well on the MMSE.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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