2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160876
Type:
Presentation
Title:
To Tell the Truth: Self-Reported Drug Use
Abstract:
To Tell the Truth: Self-Reported Drug Use
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Piacentine, Linda, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:CON - Dept. of Psychology, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI, 53226, USA
Contact Telephone:414-456-4535
Co-Authors:Stacy Claesges, BA, Research Coordinator; Alan Bloom, PhD, Professor; and Robert Risinger, MD, Assistant Professor
People often wish to give socially acceptable responses when reporting sensitive information such as illegal drug use. Researchers and clinicians depend on truthful self-reporting of current and prior drug use. The current study tested the hypothesis that underreporting of cocaine use commonly occurs among known drug users who are not in treatment and occurs more often upon phone interview than face-to-face interviews. Conceptual framework: Social desirability theory Subjects: Cocaine dependent users (n=125) meeting DSM-IV defined criteria. Method: This quasi-experimental study is part of a larger cocaine addiction study. Self-reported cocaine use data was first collected via phone interview (by a trained research assistant), then through face-to-face interviews (by a NP or by a psychiatrist trained in study specific data collection by the NP), and written questionnaires on the day of the in-person interview. Reliability, defined as consistency of answers, was assessed across the 3 data points. Based on interview responses, expected results were compared with urine drug testing. Self-report was validated when urine testing matched expectations. Results: Reliability of self-report was evaluated with Pearson correlations comparing subjects' answers from phone interviews versus subsequent face-to-face interviews and comparing face-to-face interview answers to a written questionnaire on the same day. Years of use correlated better than frequency of use (r =0.75-0.89 vs. r =0 .57-0.83) in all three methods of self-report. Self-report validity comparing expected versus actual urinalysis results demonstrated marginally better than chance agreement (k=0.39). Conclusions: Consistent with social desirability theory the results suggest that underreporting of illicit drug use is common among drug dependent users. While face-to-face interviewing elicits different responses from phone interviewing, validity is still in question. Self-reported years of use may be the best predictor of current drug use. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTo Tell the Truth: Self-Reported Drug Useen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160876-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">To Tell the Truth: Self-Reported Drug Use</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Piacentine, Linda, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Dept. of Psychology, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI, 53226, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-456-4535</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">linda.piacentine@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Stacy Claesges, BA, Research Coordinator; Alan Bloom, PhD, Professor; and Robert Risinger, MD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">People often wish to give socially acceptable responses when reporting sensitive information such as illegal drug use. Researchers and clinicians depend on truthful self-reporting of current and prior drug use. The current study tested the hypothesis that underreporting of cocaine use commonly occurs among known drug users who are not in treatment and occurs more often upon phone interview than face-to-face interviews. Conceptual framework: Social desirability theory Subjects: Cocaine dependent users (n=125) meeting DSM-IV defined criteria. Method: This quasi-experimental study is part of a larger cocaine addiction study. Self-reported cocaine use data was first collected via phone interview (by a trained research assistant), then through face-to-face interviews (by a NP or by a psychiatrist trained in study specific data collection by the NP), and written questionnaires on the day of the in-person interview. Reliability, defined as consistency of answers, was assessed across the 3 data points. Based on interview responses, expected results were compared with urine drug testing. Self-report was validated when urine testing matched expectations. Results: Reliability of self-report was evaluated with Pearson correlations comparing subjects' answers from phone interviews versus subsequent face-to-face interviews and comparing face-to-face interview answers to a written questionnaire on the same day. Years of use correlated better than frequency of use (r =0.75-0.89 vs. r =0 .57-0.83) in all three methods of self-report. Self-report validity comparing expected versus actual urinalysis results demonstrated marginally better than chance agreement (k=0.39). Conclusions: Consistent with social desirability theory the results suggest that underreporting of illicit drug use is common among drug dependent users. While face-to-face interviewing elicits different responses from phone interviewing, validity is still in question. Self-reported years of use may be the best predictor of current drug use. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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