A Comparison of Older Widows' Reports of Difficulty with ADL-IADL Tasks and Their Narratives About Managing the Tasks

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160877
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Older Widows' Reports of Difficulty with ADL-IADL Tasks and Their Narratives About Managing the Tasks
Abstract:
A Comparison of Older Widows' Reports of Difficulty with ADL-IADL Tasks and Their Narratives About Managing the Tasks
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Porter, Eileen, PhD, MA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 517 Sudbury Drive, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA
Contact Telephone:573 875-5163
Framework/Rationale: Obtaining self-reports of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are common practices in gerontological research. However, ADL-IADL measures can yield variable results, so researchers have been urged to exercise caution when using those measures and interpreting results. Purpose: To compare older widows' reports of difficulty with tasks to their narrative reports about how they managed the tasks. Participants: Over three years each of 25 older women (age 80 û 96) who lived alone had a series of 7 open-ended interviews during a phenomenological study of the experience of home care. Among other things they were asked whether or not they had difficulty and help with certain ADL and IADL tasks; they were also invited to talk about handling the task and involving helpers. Method: Descriptive phenomenology. Data were analyzed for each woman over time and compared across the sample. Results: The experience of home care was structured in part by managing jobs that are harder now and managing jobs I can no longer do. These trends were evident: (1) Hesitation in evaluating difficulty, or reports of negligible difficulty, coupled with lengthy descriptions about handling the task; (2) Reports that "difficulty" was not a suitable characterization, coupled with reports of more suitable descriptors (e.g., "irksome"); (3) Reports of difficulty unrelated to the task itself (e.g., difficulty bathing because the shower curtain had slipped off the rod). Participants reported problems with tasks rarely listed on ADL-IADL tools (e.g., making up a clean bed.) They spoke about their "hardest job" - an empirical parameter not tapped in ADL-IADL tools. Conclusions: ADL-IADL data should be considered alongside self-reports about handling tasks; reasons for difficulty should be elicited. Periodic conversations with older women are useful interventions, enabling ongoing reflection about managing tasks of daily life. Acknowledgements: Funded by NIH/NINR.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Older Widows' Reports of Difficulty with ADL-IADL Tasks and Their Narratives About Managing the Tasksen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160877-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of Older Widows' Reports of Difficulty with ADL-IADL Tasks and Their Narratives About Managing the Tasks</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Porter, Eileen, PhD, MA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 517 Sudbury Drive, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 875-5163</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">PorterEJ@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Framework/Rationale: Obtaining self-reports of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are common practices in gerontological research. However, ADL-IADL measures can yield variable results, so researchers have been urged to exercise caution when using those measures and interpreting results. Purpose: To compare older widows' reports of difficulty with tasks to their narrative reports about how they managed the tasks. Participants: Over three years each of 25 older women (age 80 &ucirc; 96) who lived alone had a series of 7 open-ended interviews during a phenomenological study of the experience of home care. Among other things they were asked whether or not they had difficulty and help with certain ADL and IADL tasks; they were also invited to talk about handling the task and involving helpers. Method: Descriptive phenomenology. Data were analyzed for each woman over time and compared across the sample. Results: The experience of home care was structured in part by managing jobs that are harder now and managing jobs I can no longer do. These trends were evident: (1) Hesitation in evaluating difficulty, or reports of negligible difficulty, coupled with lengthy descriptions about handling the task; (2) Reports that &quot;difficulty&quot; was not a suitable characterization, coupled with reports of more suitable descriptors (e.g., &quot;irksome&quot;); (3) Reports of difficulty unrelated to the task itself (e.g., difficulty bathing because the shower curtain had slipped off the rod). Participants reported problems with tasks rarely listed on ADL-IADL tools (e.g., making up a clean bed.) They spoke about their &quot;hardest job&quot; - an empirical parameter not tapped in ADL-IADL tools. Conclusions: ADL-IADL data should be considered alongside self-reports about handling tasks; reasons for difficulty should be elicited. Periodic conversations with older women are useful interventions, enabling ongoing reflection about managing tasks of daily life. Acknowledgements: Funded by NIH/NINR.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.