2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160879
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wellness for Women: Logging on to Lose Weight
Abstract:
Wellness for Women: Logging on to Lose Weight
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Pullen, Carol, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Dean
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6548
Co-Authors:Susan N. Walker, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Patricia A. Hageman, PhD, PT, Professor; Linda S. Boeckner, PhD, Professor; Maureen K. Oberdorfer, MPA, BS, Project Coordinator; Hope Jackson-Konnath, MSN, RN; and Dayna Dittmer, MSN, RN, Family Nurse Practitione
Purpose & Background: About two-thirds of U.S. adults are above normal weight. Rural women have a higher prevalence of obesity than urban women. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a web-based intervention to achieve weight loss through changes in physical activity and eating among a vulnerable population of rural older women. Participants: 21 overweight and obese (BMI 25-34.9) rural women aged 50 -69. Methods: The Health Promotion Model (Pender, 2006) was used as the conceptual framework for the study. Both Groups I and II received an Internet newsletter weekly for 3 months with recommended healthy eating and activity approaches to achieve weight loss as well as content on benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy for eating and activity; group II also participated in a weekly Internet support group. At baseline and 3 months, the women completed a computerized survey of eating and activity behaviors (Block Health Habits and History Questionnaire and 7-day Activity Recall). Measures were taken of height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and V02 max (estimated via 1-Mile Walk Test). All women were oriented to the web site, including the newsletters and logs for eating, activity, weight loss, and goals. Group II women also were shown how to post to a support group. Results: Eight women in each group completed the study. Repeated measures ANOVAs over 3 months found large effect sizes for time for % calories from fat and saturated fat (decrease), meat group servings (decrease) and cardiorespiratory fitness (increase), and large time x group interaction effects for waist circumference (decrease), weight (decrease), % body fat (decrease), fruit servings (increase), whole grain servings (increase), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (decrease), all favoring women in the support group. Implications: A full scale study is planned to further evaluate efficacy of this approach. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWellness for Women: Logging on to Lose Weighten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160879-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wellness for Women: Logging on to Lose Weight</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pullen, Carol, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6548</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chpullen@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan N. Walker, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Patricia A. Hageman, PhD, PT, Professor; Linda S. Boeckner, PhD, Professor; Maureen K. Oberdorfer, MPA, BS, Project Coordinator; Hope Jackson-Konnath, MSN, RN; and Dayna Dittmer, MSN, RN, Family Nurse Practitione</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose &amp; Background: About two-thirds of U.S. adults are above normal weight. Rural women have a higher prevalence of obesity than urban women. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a web-based intervention to achieve weight loss through changes in physical activity and eating among a vulnerable population of rural older women. Participants: 21 overweight and obese (BMI 25-34.9) rural women aged 50 -69. Methods: The Health Promotion Model (Pender, 2006) was used as the conceptual framework for the study. Both Groups I and II received an Internet newsletter weekly for 3 months with recommended healthy eating and activity approaches to achieve weight loss as well as content on benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy for eating and activity; group II also participated in a weekly Internet support group. At baseline and 3 months, the women completed a computerized survey of eating and activity behaviors (Block Health Habits and History Questionnaire and 7-day Activity Recall). Measures were taken of height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and V02 max (estimated via 1-Mile Walk Test). All women were oriented to the web site, including the newsletters and logs for eating, activity, weight loss, and goals. Group II women also were shown how to post to a support group. Results: Eight women in each group completed the study. Repeated measures ANOVAs over 3 months found large effect sizes for time for % calories from fat and saturated fat (decrease), meat group servings (decrease) and cardiorespiratory fitness (increase), and large time x group interaction effects for waist circumference (decrease), weight (decrease), % body fat (decrease), fruit servings (increase), whole grain servings (increase), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (decrease), all favoring women in the support group. Implications: A full scale study is planned to further evaluate efficacy of this approach. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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