2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160880
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contribution of mobility and skin temperature to pressure ulcer risk
Abstract:
Contribution of mobility and skin temperature to pressure ulcer risk
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Rapp, Mary Pat, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center Houston
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing - Office 7.748, 6901 Bertner Blvd, Houston, TX, 77030, USA
Contact Telephone:713 500 2133
Co-Authors:Nancy Bergstrom, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Purpose: The purpose is of the study is to determine if the complexity of mobility and skin temperature differ between nursing facility (NF) residents at high and low risk for pressure ulcers. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Pressure ulcer risk is determined by the intensity and duration of external pressure and tissue tolerance to pressure. Complexity, the ability of a system to adapt, decreases with age and infirmity. Complexity in mobility patterns, a proxy measure of pressure exposure and skin temperature as a proxy measure of blood flow, may enhance the knowledge of pressure ulcer risk. Subjects: A convenience sample of 15 NF residents, 72 - 97 years old, primarily female (8), White (13), 7 at high (score < 13), and 8 at low or no risk (score > 14) for pressure ulcers using the Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk were enrolled. Method: Mobility and skin temperature were measured simultaneously for 96 hours using actigraphy (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY) and a skin temperature thermistor (Series 2000 Mini-Logger, MiniMitter, Bend, OR). Detrended fluctuation analysis (dfa) and sample entropy (sampen) were computed using Matlab 14.0. SPSS 11.5 was used for analysis of variance. Results: DFA for mobility and skin temperature revealed significantly (p < .01) lower means for high than for low risk subjects (mobility mean .79 +/- .23 versus .89 +/- .12; skin temperature mean, 2.0 +/- .17, versus 2.1, +/- .08 respectively). Sample entropy was significantly greater (p < .01) for higher than lower risk subjects (mobility mean .51, +/- .29 versus .35, +/- .11; skin temperature mean .17. +/- .7 versus .13, +/- .04, respectively). Conclusions: Complexity measures differentiate between residents at high and low risk for pressure ulcers. Understanding complexity may enhance our knowledge of frailty in old age. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContribution of mobility and skin temperature to pressure ulcer risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160880-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Contribution of mobility and skin temperature to pressure ulcer risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rapp, Mary Pat, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - Office 7.748, 6901 Bertner Blvd, Houston, TX, 77030, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">713 500 2133</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.p.rapp@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Bergstrom, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose is of the study is to determine if the complexity of mobility and skin temperature differ between nursing facility (NF) residents at high and low risk for pressure ulcers. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Pressure ulcer risk is determined by the intensity and duration of external pressure and tissue tolerance to pressure. Complexity, the ability of a system to adapt, decreases with age and infirmity. Complexity in mobility patterns, a proxy measure of pressure exposure and skin temperature as a proxy measure of blood flow, may enhance the knowledge of pressure ulcer risk. Subjects: A convenience sample of 15 NF residents, 72 - 97 years old, primarily female (8), White (13), 7 at high (score &lt; 13), and 8 at low or no risk (score &gt; 14) for pressure ulcers using the Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk were enrolled. Method: Mobility and skin temperature were measured simultaneously for 96 hours using actigraphy (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY) and a skin temperature thermistor (Series 2000 Mini-Logger, MiniMitter, Bend, OR). Detrended fluctuation analysis (dfa) and sample entropy (sampen) were computed using Matlab 14.0. SPSS 11.5 was used for analysis of variance. Results: DFA for mobility and skin temperature revealed significantly (p &lt; .01) lower means for high than for low risk subjects (mobility mean .79 +/- .23 versus .89 +/- .12; skin temperature mean, 2.0 +/- .17, versus 2.1, +/- .08 respectively). Sample entropy was significantly greater (p &lt; .01) for higher than lower risk subjects (mobility mean .51, +/- .29 versus .35, +/- .11; skin temperature mean .17. +/- .7 versus .13, +/- .04, respectively). Conclusions: Complexity measures differentiate between residents at high and low risk for pressure ulcers. Understanding complexity may enhance our knowledge of frailty in old age. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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