Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Interpersonal Influences on Their Physical Activity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160881
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Interpersonal Influences on Their Physical Activity
Abstract:
Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Interpersonal Influences on Their Physical Activity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Robbins, Lorraine, DNSc, RN, CFNP
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A203 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1314, USA
Contact Telephone:517-353-3011
Co-Authors:Kimberlee A. Gretebeck, PhD, RN and Nola J. Pender, PhD, RN, FAAN
Increasing physical activity (PA) is a public health priority. PA participation declines strikingly across adolescence and is more profound for girls than boys. Detailed information is lacking concerning interpersonal influences that may affect adolescent girls' predisposition to engage in regular PA. The purpose of this descriptive study was two-fold: (1) to identify the individuals that adolescent girls perceive as helping them the most to be physically active and (2) to explore the following interpersonal influences or cognitions concerning the behaviors or attitudes of others as identified in the Health Promotion Model: norms or expectations of significant others; modeling or vicarious learning through observing others engaged in a behavior; and social support or instrumental and emotional encouragement. A total of 77 racially diverse girls from two middle schools in low socioeconomic geographic areas of the Midwest participated. Inclusion criteria were as follows: 11 to 14 years of age; healthy with no acute or chronic health conditions limiting PA participation; and physically inactive most days of the week and not involved in continuous competitive sports. Participants responded to questionnaires specifically designed to assess interpersonal influences. Frequencies and percentages were computed for item responses. When participants were asked to list the top three individuals who could help them the most to be active, the majority identified their mother. Friend was reported as the second most helpful person. Sixty-six (85.5%) of the participants had at least one significant other with high expectations that they exercise. The majority identified this person as their mother, who was again followed by their friend. Although norms or expectations were high, over one-third of the girls lacked role models for moderate to vigorous PA. Various forms of social support from key individuals were also limited. Specific details concerning social support will be presented. Implications for nursing will be discussed. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Girls' Perceptions of Interpersonal Influences on Their Physical Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160881-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Interpersonal Influences on Their Physical Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robbins, Lorraine, DNSc, RN, CFNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A203 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1314, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-353-3011</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">robbin76@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kimberlee A. Gretebeck, PhD, RN and Nola J. Pender, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing physical activity (PA) is a public health priority. PA participation declines strikingly across adolescence and is more profound for girls than boys. Detailed information is lacking concerning interpersonal influences that may affect adolescent girls' predisposition to engage in regular PA. The purpose of this descriptive study was two-fold: (1) to identify the individuals that adolescent girls perceive as helping them the most to be physically active and (2) to explore the following interpersonal influences or cognitions concerning the behaviors or attitudes of others as identified in the Health Promotion Model: norms or expectations of significant others; modeling or vicarious learning through observing others engaged in a behavior; and social support or instrumental and emotional encouragement. A total of 77 racially diverse girls from two middle schools in low socioeconomic geographic areas of the Midwest participated. Inclusion criteria were as follows: 11 to 14 years of age; healthy with no acute or chronic health conditions limiting PA participation; and physically inactive most days of the week and not involved in continuous competitive sports. Participants responded to questionnaires specifically designed to assess interpersonal influences. Frequencies and percentages were computed for item responses. When participants were asked to list the top three individuals who could help them the most to be active, the majority identified their mother. Friend was reported as the second most helpful person. Sixty-six (85.5%) of the participants had at least one significant other with high expectations that they exercise. The majority identified this person as their mother, who was again followed by their friend. Although norms or expectations were high, over one-third of the girls lacked role models for moderate to vigorous PA. Various forms of social support from key individuals were also limited. Specific details concerning social support will be presented. Implications for nursing will be discussed. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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