Neuropsychological, Adolescent, and Family Factors Associated with Adaptation Outcomes in Spina Bifida

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160886
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neuropsychological, Adolescent, and Family Factors Associated with Adaptation Outcomes in Spina Bifida
Abstract:
Neuropsychological, Adolescent, and Family Factors Associated with Adaptation Outcomes in Spina Bifida
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sawin, Kathleen, DNS, CPNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wis-Milwaukee/Children's Hospital of Wi
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Box 413, Cunningham Hall Rm 637, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:4142295318
Co-Authors:Amy K. Heffelfinger, PhD, Assistant Professor; Jennifer I. Koop, PhD, Assistant Professor; Lisa L. Conant, PhD, Assistant Professor; Timothy J. Brei, MD, Associate Professor; and Philip F. Fastenau, PhD, Associate Professor
Spina Bifida (SB), the second most frequent childhood disability, is associated with poor adaptive outcomes. Few studies have investigated variability in these outcomes or factors that potentially contribute to adaptation. In this pilot study, a model was tested to explain the impact of neurological severity, neuropsychological functioning (NPF), adolescent protective variables and family protective variables on adaptation outcomes (functional status, mental health [MH], and health-related quality of life [HRQOL]) in adolescents with SB.

Fifty adolescents with SB (age; 15.6 years+/-2.5) completed 1) a NPF battery assessing executive functioning (EF), attention, and processing speed and 2) parental and self-report questionnaires assessing the outcome variables, as well as protective variables such as adolescent activities (decision making, household responsibility) or adolescent beliefs (hope/attitude), and family satisfaction.

The neurological severity and NPF were related to functional status but not MH or HRQOL measures (r[47]=37 -.55). The Adolescent activity composite was associated with functional status (r[45]=.77) but not MH or HRQOL while adolescent beliefs were related to MH and HRQOL (r[45]=.43-.45) but not functional status. Family satisfaction was not significant related to functional status, MH or HRQOL. The hierarchical regression model (including age, neurological severity, EF, and adolescent activities) accounted for 63% of the variance in functional status, but in the final step, only EF and adolescent activities remained significant. In contrast, adolescent beliefs primarily explained 25% of the variance in MH and 32% of the variance in HRQOL.

These results support the impact of differing factors on outcomes. In particular, variables measuring EF and adolescent activities are related to the adolescent's physical functioning, whereas their more internal belief system is related to how they are feeling. Targeting interventions toward the factors related to specific outcomes may assist in optimizing adaptive outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeuropsychological, Adolescent, and Family Factors Associated with Adaptation Outcomes in Spina Bifidaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160886-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Neuropsychological, Adolescent, and Family Factors Associated with Adaptation Outcomes in Spina Bifida</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sawin, Kathleen, DNS, CPNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wis-Milwaukee/Children's Hospital of Wi</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Box 413, Cunningham Hall Rm 637, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4142295318</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sawin@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amy K. Heffelfinger, PhD, Assistant Professor; Jennifer I. Koop, PhD, Assistant Professor; Lisa L. Conant, PhD, Assistant Professor; Timothy J. Brei, MD, Associate Professor; and Philip F. Fastenau, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Spina Bifida (SB), the second most frequent childhood disability, is associated with poor adaptive outcomes. Few studies have investigated variability in these outcomes or factors that potentially contribute to adaptation. In this pilot study, a model was tested to explain the impact of neurological severity, neuropsychological functioning (NPF), adolescent protective variables and family protective variables on adaptation outcomes (functional status, mental health [MH], and health-related quality of life [HRQOL]) in adolescents with SB. <br/><br/>Fifty adolescents with SB (age; 15.6 years+/-2.5) completed 1) a NPF battery assessing executive functioning (EF), attention, and processing speed and 2) parental and self-report questionnaires assessing the outcome variables, as well as protective variables such as adolescent activities (decision making, household responsibility) or adolescent beliefs (hope/attitude), and family satisfaction. <br/><br/>The neurological severity and NPF were related to functional status but not MH or HRQOL measures (r[47]=37 -.55). The Adolescent activity composite was associated with functional status (r[45]=.77) but not MH or HRQOL while adolescent beliefs were related to MH and HRQOL (r[45]=.43-.45) but not functional status. Family satisfaction was not significant related to functional status, MH or HRQOL. The hierarchical regression model (including age, neurological severity, EF, and adolescent activities) accounted for 63% of the variance in functional status, but in the final step, only EF and adolescent activities remained significant. In contrast, adolescent beliefs primarily explained 25% of the variance in MH and 32% of the variance in HRQOL. <br/><br/>These results support the impact of differing factors on outcomes. In particular, variables measuring EF and adolescent activities are related to the adolescent's physical functioning, whereas their more internal belief system is related to how they are feeling. Targeting interventions toward the factors related to specific outcomes may assist in optimizing adaptive outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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