2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160887
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of Adherence for Patients with Heart Failure
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of Adherence for Patients with Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Scotto, Carrie, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 2688 Cardington Green, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA
Contact Telephone:330.699.2362
Problem: Non-adherence is the primary cause of hospital readmission for patients with heart failure. While some demographic and social variable are associated with adherence, the identification of these variable does not address the complex problem of adherence. Little is known about the fundamental nature of adherence. This study explored the lived experience of patients with heart failure as they attempt to adhere to a prescribed regimen of care.

Framework/Methods: Fourteen patients attending an outpatient heart failure clinic after hospital readmission for exacerbation of heart failure symptoms were interviewed. Transcription of the interviews provided data for phenomenological analysis and interpretation using methods described by Cohen, Kahn, and Steeves based on the Dutch phenomenology of the Utrecht School

Analysis: Data analysis indicated that within the experience of attempting to adhere to prescribed care regimens, participants' initial acceptance of their diagnosis resulted in a changed self-image. Behaviors appropriate to the new self-image were integrated into the former lifestyle by means of planning and setting routine. Identified themes that influence adherence to the new behaviors included personal beliefs and values, support from significant others and health care professionals, unusual circumstances, and temptation overcoming motivation.

Relevance: Adherence is primary to the effectiveness of any health regimen. Assessment of personal and circumstantial elements that affect adherence can be useful in developing more effective individualized treatment plans for this population. A closer look at discrete events of non-adherent decision making may indicate effective ways to promote adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Adherence for Patients with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160887-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of Adherence for Patients with Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scotto, Carrie, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 2688 Cardington Green, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.699.2362</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cscotto@neo.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Non-adherence is the primary cause of hospital readmission for patients with heart failure. While some demographic and social variable are associated with adherence, the identification of these variable does not address the complex problem of adherence. Little is known about the fundamental nature of adherence. This study explored the lived experience of patients with heart failure as they attempt to adhere to a prescribed regimen of care. <br/><br/>Framework/Methods: Fourteen patients attending an outpatient heart failure clinic after hospital readmission for exacerbation of heart failure symptoms were interviewed. Transcription of the interviews provided data for phenomenological analysis and interpretation using methods described by Cohen, Kahn, and Steeves based on the Dutch phenomenology of the Utrecht School<br/><br/>Analysis: Data analysis indicated that within the experience of attempting to adhere to prescribed care regimens, participants' initial acceptance of their diagnosis resulted in a changed self-image. Behaviors appropriate to the new self-image were integrated into the former lifestyle by means of planning and setting routine. Identified themes that influence adherence to the new behaviors included personal beliefs and values, support from significant others and health care professionals, unusual circumstances, and temptation overcoming motivation.<br/><br/>Relevance: Adherence is primary to the effectiveness of any health regimen. Assessment of personal and circumstantial elements that affect adherence can be useful in developing more effective individualized treatment plans for this population. A closer look at discrete events of non-adherent decision making may indicate effective ways to promote adherence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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