Environmental Health Risk Communication Research: Findings and Implications for Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160888
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Environmental Health Risk Communication Research: Findings and Implications for Practice
Abstract:
Environmental Health Risk Communication Research: Findings and Implications for Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Severtson, Dolores, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:SON- H6/295 CSC, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5311
Co-Authors:Linda Baumann, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor and Roger Brown, PhD, Professor
Nurses have an important role in translating environmental health (EH) risk information into messages the public can understand and use to mitigate EH risks. This role is informed by understanding how people use and respond to risk information. A well testing program (WTP) was offered to residents in an advisory area where 23.5% of private wells have arsenic levels > the drinking water standard. Our theory-based evaluation research sought to understand how people used, made sense of, and responded to information about arsenic-contaminated well water. The common sense model (CSM) has shown that people process health threat information to formulate representations that guide responses to threats. We applied the CSM to develop a survey that measured information use, risk representations, and outcomes of water safety judgments and protective behavior. Of 1496 surveys mailed to residents in 17 WTP communities; 1275 (85%) were returned. Mailed information was used most often, personal contacts rated most useful, and more residents tested privately than through the WTP. Among participants with arsenic levels over the standard, 62% rated their water as safe and about half were not reducing exposure. We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to develop multivariate measures of CSM representations. Structural equation modeling quantified CSM relationships between information, representations, and outcomes (RMSEA = .075). Participants that identified a water problem were more likely to reduce exposure to arsenic. People must know and understand their arsenic level, the drinking water standard, and the relevance of sensory water qualities to accurately identify a water problem. People need concrete information about environmental risk at both personal and environmental levels to promote a comprehensive understanding and response. The CSM had utility for understanding responses to EH risk information. Nurses need to participate in risk communication research and apply research findings to inform their risk communication practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnvironmental Health Risk Communication Research: Findings and Implications for Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160888-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Environmental Health Risk Communication Research: Findings and Implications for Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Severtson, Dolores, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON- H6/295 CSC, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">djsevert@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Baumann, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor and Roger Brown, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses have an important role in translating environmental health (EH) risk information into messages the public can understand and use to mitigate EH risks. This role is informed by understanding how people use and respond to risk information. A well testing program (WTP) was offered to residents in an advisory area where 23.5% of private wells have arsenic levels &gt; the drinking water standard. Our theory-based evaluation research sought to understand how people used, made sense of, and responded to information about arsenic-contaminated well water. The common sense model (CSM) has shown that people process health threat information to formulate representations that guide responses to threats. We applied the CSM to develop a survey that measured information use, risk representations, and outcomes of water safety judgments and protective behavior. Of 1496 surveys mailed to residents in 17 WTP communities; 1275 (85%) were returned. Mailed information was used most often, personal contacts rated most useful, and more residents tested privately than through the WTP. Among participants with arsenic levels over the standard, 62% rated their water as safe and about half were not reducing exposure. We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to develop multivariate measures of CSM representations. Structural equation modeling quantified CSM relationships between information, representations, and outcomes (RMSEA = .075). Participants that identified a water problem were more likely to reduce exposure to arsenic. People must know and understand their arsenic level, the drinking water standard, and the relevance of sensory water qualities to accurately identify a water problem. People need concrete information about environmental risk at both personal and environmental levels to promote a comprehensive understanding and response. The CSM had utility for understanding responses to EH risk information. Nurses need to participate in risk communication research and apply research findings to inform their risk communication practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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