2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160889
Type:
Presentation
Title:
My Sister, Myself: Culture and Health for Africana Girls
Abstract:
My Sister, Myself: Culture and Health for Africana Girls
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Shambley-Ebron, Donna, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
Contact Telephone:513-558-5248
Purpose This research study explored the cultural values and beliefs of adolescent African American girls and their mothers. The study also explored how participation in a cultural group experience that promoted ethnic identity, culture and gender pride, sexual health and body knowledge, influenced African American girls' intentions for future sexual activity. Background African American women carry a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in this country. Sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors must be studied in the high risk population of African American adolescent girls, when sexual decision-making often begins. Pride in cultural heritage and values, positive ethnic and gender identity, and development of appropriate body knowledge can promote healthy sexual decision making in African American girls. Theoretical Framework An Africana Womanist framework was used to guide this study. Sample The participants were eight African American girls between the ages of 10-13 years and their mothers. Method The technical collaboration approach of community-based action research was the methodology used. Cultural traditions and values, sexual health, and body knowledge were incorporated into an 8 week intervention. Three focus groups were conducted with the girls before the intervention, mid-intervention and post-intervention. Two focus groups were conducted at 6 and 12 months post-intervention. The researcher conducted ethnographic interviews with the mothers mid-intervention. Data were analyzed by constant comparative and inductive analyses. Results/Conclusions Themes generated were: "High Aspirations", "Internal, External, and Eternal Resources", "Embracing my heritage", and "Needing to know the truth." Results indicated that sessions were effective in increasing sexual knowledge, enhancing ethnic and gender identity, fostering a positive sense of self, and equipping girls for delaying sexual involvement. Culturally appropriate, gender specific interventions can be effective in improving sexual health in adolescents. This work provides the foundation for studies that investigate innovative ways to decrease the disparities of HIV/AIDS in African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMy Sister, Myself: Culture and Health for Africana Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160889-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">My Sister, Myself: Culture and Health for Africana Girls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shambley-Ebron, Donna, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-558-5248</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.shambley-ebron@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose This research study explored the cultural values and beliefs of adolescent African American girls and their mothers. The study also explored how participation in a cultural group experience that promoted ethnic identity, culture and gender pride, sexual health and body knowledge, influenced African American girls' intentions for future sexual activity. Background African American women carry a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in this country. Sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors must be studied in the high risk population of African American adolescent girls, when sexual decision-making often begins. Pride in cultural heritage and values, positive ethnic and gender identity, and development of appropriate body knowledge can promote healthy sexual decision making in African American girls. Theoretical Framework An Africana Womanist framework was used to guide this study. Sample The participants were eight African American girls between the ages of 10-13 years and their mothers. Method The technical collaboration approach of community-based action research was the methodology used. Cultural traditions and values, sexual health, and body knowledge were incorporated into an 8 week intervention. Three focus groups were conducted with the girls before the intervention, mid-intervention and post-intervention. Two focus groups were conducted at 6 and 12 months post-intervention. The researcher conducted ethnographic interviews with the mothers mid-intervention. Data were analyzed by constant comparative and inductive analyses. Results/Conclusions Themes generated were: &quot;High Aspirations&quot;, &quot;Internal, External, and Eternal Resources&quot;, &quot;Embracing my heritage&quot;, and &quot;Needing to know the truth.&quot; Results indicated that sessions were effective in increasing sexual knowledge, enhancing ethnic and gender identity, fostering a positive sense of self, and equipping girls for delaying sexual involvement. Culturally appropriate, gender specific interventions can be effective in improving sexual health in adolescents. This work provides the foundation for studies that investigate innovative ways to decrease the disparities of HIV/AIDS in African American women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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