2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160891
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment Strategy Influences Gender Differences in Cardiac Symptom Reports
Abstract:
Assessment Strategy Influences Gender Differences in Cardiac Symptom Reports
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Shin, Ju Young, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 50 Newton Rd, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-3609
Co-Authors:Rene Martin, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; M. Bryant Howren, BS, Predoctoral Student; James Bunde, PhDc, BA; Patricia Lounsbury, MEd, Cardiac Rehab Coordinator; and Ellen Gordon, MD, Professor
PURPOSE: The literature on gender differences in cardiac symptoms is mixed. We explored how the format of assessment questions (open-ended vs. open-ended plus checklist) influenced symptom reports among MI patients.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Leventhal's self-regulatory model assumes self-care behaviors are shaped by lay beliefs about symptoms, etiology, duration, consequences, and cure (i.e., illness representations). The present study involved secondary analyses of interview data from a broader study of patients' representations of MI.

SUBJECTS: Participants (N = 391) were post-MI (72% male; 90% Caucasian; M age = 59.41).

METHOD: Secondary analyses focused on narrative transcripts of participants' reports of the symptoms they experienced prior to hospitalization. Subjects first described their symptoms in response to an open-ended inquiry; a closed-ended checklist of common MI symptoms then was reviewed. The number and type of symptoms reported in response to each assessment strategy was determined through content analysis.

RESULTS: For responses to the open-ended question only, regression analyses (controlling for cardiac history, diabetes, depression, and neuroticism) found no difference in the number of symptoms reported by women and men, b = .07, ns. However, when checklist responses were added to the assessment, women (vs. men) reported significantly more symptoms, b = .14, p = .005. When only open-ended responses were considered, logistic regression analyses (controlling for same covariates) revealed no gender differences in likelihood of reporting chest pain, b = .28, ns. However, with the inclusion of checklist responses, women (78%) were significantly less likely than their male (87%) counterparts to report chest pain, b = .71, p = .02.

CONCLUSIONS: Gender differences in cardiac symptom reports varied as a function of assessment strategy. Therefore, both methods should be used to assess cardiac symptoms among MI patients in clinical settings and to facilitate prompt treatment-seeking behavior. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment Strategy Influences Gender Differences in Cardiac Symptom Reportsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160891-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessment Strategy Influences Gender Differences in Cardiac Symptom Reports</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shin, Ju Young, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 50 Newton Rd, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-3609</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">juyoung-shin@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rene Martin, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; M. Bryant Howren, BS, Predoctoral Student; James Bunde, PhDc, BA; Patricia Lounsbury, MEd, Cardiac Rehab Coordinator; and Ellen Gordon, MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The literature on gender differences in cardiac symptoms is mixed. We explored how the format of assessment questions (open-ended vs. open-ended plus checklist) influenced symptom reports among MI patients.<br/><br/>CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Leventhal's self-regulatory model assumes self-care behaviors are shaped by lay beliefs about symptoms, etiology, duration, consequences, and cure (i.e., illness representations). The present study involved secondary analyses of interview data from a broader study of patients' representations of MI.<br/><br/>SUBJECTS: Participants (N = 391) were post-MI (72% male; 90% Caucasian; M age = 59.41).<br/><br/>METHOD: Secondary analyses focused on narrative transcripts of participants' reports of the symptoms they experienced prior to hospitalization. Subjects first described their symptoms in response to an open-ended inquiry; a closed-ended checklist of common MI symptoms then was reviewed. The number and type of symptoms reported in response to each assessment strategy was determined through content analysis.<br/><br/>RESULTS: For responses to the open-ended question only, regression analyses (controlling for cardiac history, diabetes, depression, and neuroticism) found no difference in the number of symptoms reported by women and men, b = .07, ns. However, when checklist responses were added to the assessment, women (vs. men) reported significantly more symptoms, b = .14, p = .005. When only open-ended responses were considered, logistic regression analyses (controlling for same covariates) revealed no gender differences in likelihood of reporting chest pain, b = .28, ns. However, with the inclusion of checklist responses, women (78%) were significantly less likely than their male (87%) counterparts to report chest pain, b = .71, p = .02.<br/><br/>CONCLUSIONS: Gender differences in cardiac symptom reports varied as a function of assessment strategy. Therefore, both methods should be used to assess cardiac symptoms among MI patients in clinical settings and to facilitate prompt treatment-seeking behavior. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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