2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160896
Type:
Presentation
Title:
'Who Does What and When' in Families with Youth Born with HIV
Abstract:
'Who Does What and When' in Families with Youth Born with HIV
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Stieglitz, Kimberly, DNSc, APRN, BC, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:Doisy College of Health Science
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8948
Co-Authors:Phyllis Ballard, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Kelly Nolan, MSW, LCSW, Case Manager; Stacey Slovacek, BS, Case Manager; Kathleen A. McGann, MD, Associate Professor; and Gregory Storch, MD, Professor
Children born with HIV are now living well into adolescence. Peripubescent youth with HIV are experiencing all the usual challenges of development, along with specific issues related to managing a stigmatized chronic illness. Anecdotally, youth remain at high risk for secondary HIV infection through sexual activity/experimentation, transmitting to partners because of not using condoms, and non-disclosure of status. Inconsistent adherence to medications can result in viral resistance, thereby limiting future use of antiretroviral medications. Purpose: To explore and describe how families with pre- and early adolescents manage perinatally acquired HIV illness during rapid developmental transitions. Conceptual Framework: The Family Management Styles (FMS) organizes the study. Participants: The sample currently consists of five biologic families with youth aged 11-14 years, and will include up to 16 families with 8-16 year olds. Method: This focused ethnography uses interviews, field notes, and observation. Results: Preliminary analyses using family role as unit of analysis reveal coding schema suggesting that: a) reports of medication adherence are problematic, varying greatly between adult caregivers, youth, and staff; b) adults believe their child is knowledgeable about sexual health, but youth state they are not; c) adults have an intuitive sense of when children are ready to assume more responsibility, but youth have no frame of reference; d) responsibility for management fluctuates based on performance; e) domains of what constitutes self-care management in HIV care are still unclear except for medication adherence, and f) the level of caregiver protectiveness of children varies significantly. This project is in the process of identifying relevant interventions that will support families in transitioning care from adults to youth, adds to nursing knowledge about chronic illness care, and assesses the feasibility of using the FMS framework with families with HIV. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title'Who Does What and When' in Families with Youth Born with HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160896-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">'Who Does What and When' in Families with Youth Born with HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stieglitz, Kimberly, DNSc, APRN, BC, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Doisy College of Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8948</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kstiegl@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Phyllis Ballard, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Kelly Nolan, MSW, LCSW, Case Manager; Stacey Slovacek, BS, Case Manager; Kathleen A. McGann, MD, Associate Professor; and Gregory Storch, MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Children born with HIV are now living well into adolescence. Peripubescent youth with HIV are experiencing all the usual challenges of development, along with specific issues related to managing a stigmatized chronic illness. Anecdotally, youth remain at high risk for secondary HIV infection through sexual activity/experimentation, transmitting to partners because of not using condoms, and non-disclosure of status. Inconsistent adherence to medications can result in viral resistance, thereby limiting future use of antiretroviral medications. Purpose: To explore and describe how families with pre- and early adolescents manage perinatally acquired HIV illness during rapid developmental transitions. Conceptual Framework: The Family Management Styles (FMS) organizes the study. Participants: The sample currently consists of five biologic families with youth aged 11-14 years, and will include up to 16 families with 8-16 year olds. Method: This focused ethnography uses interviews, field notes, and observation. Results: Preliminary analyses using family role as unit of analysis reveal coding schema suggesting that: a) reports of medication adherence are problematic, varying greatly between adult caregivers, youth, and staff; b) adults believe their child is knowledgeable about sexual health, but youth state they are not; c) adults have an intuitive sense of when children are ready to assume more responsibility, but youth have no frame of reference; d) responsibility for management fluctuates based on performance; e) domains of what constitutes self-care management in HIV care are still unclear except for medication adherence, and f) the level of caregiver protectiveness of children varies significantly. This project is in the process of identifying relevant interventions that will support families in transitioning care from adults to youth, adds to nursing knowledge about chronic illness care, and assesses the feasibility of using the FMS framework with families with HIV. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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