2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160899
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family-Centered Care: Perspectives of Children and Families
Abstract:
Family-Centered Care: Perspectives of Children and Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Thornburg, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON - 138 Cohn Building, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4481
Co-Authors:Beverly Crider, ANP, Director; Linda A. Lewandowski, PhD, Associate Professor; Darlene Blair, MSN, Instructor; and Kathleen Kowalewski, MSN, Instructor
Family-centered care (FCC), i.e., including patients and families as full collaborators and partners in care, is a major focus at many children's hospitals. Information from focus groups, satisfaction surveys, informal feedback, and clinical observations at an urban hospital indicated that FCC could be improved. The study purpose was to gather specific ôbaselineö information to better plan and evaluate program initiatives. No suitable tool existed; therefore, two questionnaires using an FCC theoretical perspective were developed. A familiar ôreport cardö format on which experiences are ôgradedö from A to F was used. The self-administered survey takes 10-20 minutes to complete. Parents and children over age 8 were surveyed once to determine their perceptions of inpatient FCC. Included were convenience samples of 200 parents and of 80 children. A parent and/or a child could participate whether or not the other participated. The parents gave oral informed consent for their children. Oral consent was for identity protectionùno names were recorded and there were no links between parent and child responses. Questionnaires were returned into a sealed box. Participants were given a small souvenir gift. Descriptive analysis showed that most grades were A-B, with fewer F's. The highest grades from children were on being treated with ôloving careö and family knowing ôhow to take care of me at home.ö The lowest were on sleep interruption, not having a teacher, being hungry too long, and not being able to go home. Parents graded people highly on respecting privacy and confidentiality, and lowest on doctors spending enough time, asking about goals, sleep interruption, unnecessary waiting, and not having a teacher or an interpreter. In conclusion, recommendations were for maintaining perceived strengths, establishing priority interventions based on the lowest grades, and resurveying subjects after the interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily-Centered Care: Perspectives of Children and Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160899-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family-Centered Care: Perspectives of Children and Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thornburg, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - 138 Cohn Building, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4481</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pthornburg@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly Crider, ANP, Director; Linda A. Lewandowski, PhD, Associate Professor; Darlene Blair, MSN, Instructor; and Kathleen Kowalewski, MSN, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family-centered care (FCC), i.e., including patients and families as full collaborators and partners in care, is a major focus at many children's hospitals. Information from focus groups, satisfaction surveys, informal feedback, and clinical observations at an urban hospital indicated that FCC could be improved. The study purpose was to gather specific &ocirc;baseline&ouml; information to better plan and evaluate program initiatives. No suitable tool existed; therefore, two questionnaires using an FCC theoretical perspective were developed. A familiar &ocirc;report card&ouml; format on which experiences are &ocirc;graded&ouml; from A to F was used. The self-administered survey takes 10-20 minutes to complete. Parents and children over age 8 were surveyed once to determine their perceptions of inpatient FCC. Included were convenience samples of 200 parents and of 80 children. A parent and/or a child could participate whether or not the other participated. The parents gave oral informed consent for their children. Oral consent was for identity protection&ugrave;no names were recorded and there were no links between parent and child responses. Questionnaires were returned into a sealed box. Participants were given a small souvenir gift. Descriptive analysis showed that most grades were A-B, with fewer F's. The highest grades from children were on being treated with &ocirc;loving care&ouml; and family knowing &ocirc;how to take care of me at home.&ouml; The lowest were on sleep interruption, not having a teacher, being hungry too long, and not being able to go home. Parents graded people highly on respecting privacy and confidentiality, and lowest on doctors spending enough time, asking about goals, sleep interruption, unnecessary waiting, and not having a teacher or an interpreter. In conclusion, recommendations were for maintaining perceived strengths, establishing priority interventions based on the lowest grades, and resurveying subjects after the interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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