Population Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Infections in U.S. Male Military Veterans and Nonveterans

6.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160902
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Population Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Infections in U.S. Male Military Veterans and Nonveterans
Abstract:
Population Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Infections in U.S. Male Military Veterans and Nonveterans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Valerius, Arnold, PhD, RN, NP
P.I. Institution Name:Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Department of Medicine, 3450 South Wehr Road, New Berlin, WI, 53146-2544, USA
Contact Telephone:262-970-7705
Purpose: The aims of this study were to examine possible risk factors for hepatitis C (nutrition; physical exercise; use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs; and risky sexual practices) in U.S. male military veterans and nonveterans; and to develop a parsimonious model to explain the relationship between military veteran status and risk of hepatitis C. Method: A modification of Evans and Stoddard's (1990) epidemiological framework was used to guide this study. Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) was used. SUDANN was used to estimate population-based prevalence and to conduct weighted logistic regression analyses. Findings: The prevalence of hepatitis C in the estimated noninstitutionalized U. S. adult male population was 3.1%. Hepatitis C was twice as prevalent in nonveterans as in military veterans (3.6% vs. 1.7%). The risk of hepatitis C in military veterans compared to nonveterans in this multivariate model was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.29û1.09). The strongest risk factors for hepatitis C seropositivity, adjusted for all other risk factors in the model including military veteran status, were evidence of hepatitis B infection, ever using cocaine, sexual intercourse before age 18, age 30-55, not having a particular place for health care, being single, and education less than 12 years. Conclusions: Contrary to expectations based on the higher prevalence of hepatitis C within the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, past military service in this population-based study was associated with a decreased risk of hepatitis C infection. This research will aid in developing better hepatitis C prevention programs in high-risk populations and assist healthcare practitioners in patient education and counseling. Further research is needed to determine the most effective strategies to prevent hepatitis C transmission and to screen for and effectively treat hepatitis C early in the course of the disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePopulation Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Infections in U.S. Male Military Veterans and Nonveteransen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160902-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Population Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Infections in U.S. Male Military Veterans and Nonveterans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Valerius, Arnold, PhD, RN, NP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Medicine, 3450 South Wehr Road, New Berlin, WI, 53146-2544, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">262-970-7705</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">valerius@wi.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The aims of this study were to examine possible risk factors for hepatitis C (nutrition; physical exercise; use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs; and risky sexual practices) in U.S. male military veterans and nonveterans; and to develop a parsimonious model to explain the relationship between military veteran status and risk of hepatitis C. Method: A modification of Evans and Stoddard's (1990) epidemiological framework was used to guide this study. Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) was used. SUDANN was used to estimate population-based prevalence and to conduct weighted logistic regression analyses. Findings: The prevalence of hepatitis C in the estimated noninstitutionalized U. S. adult male population was 3.1%. Hepatitis C was twice as prevalent in nonveterans as in military veterans (3.6% vs. 1.7%). The risk of hepatitis C in military veterans compared to nonveterans in this multivariate model was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.29&ucirc;1.09). The strongest risk factors for hepatitis C seropositivity, adjusted for all other risk factors in the model including military veteran status, were evidence of hepatitis B infection, ever using cocaine, sexual intercourse before age 18, age 30-55, not having a particular place for health care, being single, and education less than 12 years. Conclusions: Contrary to expectations based on the higher prevalence of hepatitis C within the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, past military service in this population-based study was associated with a decreased risk of hepatitis C infection. This research will aid in developing better hepatitis C prevention programs in high-risk populations and assist healthcare practitioners in patient education and counseling. Further research is needed to determine the most effective strategies to prevent hepatitis C transmission and to screen for and effectively treat hepatitis C early in the course of the disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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