2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160905
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Theoretical Underpinnings of the Representational Approach to Patient Education
Abstract:
Theoretical Underpinnings of the Representational Approach to Patient Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ward, Sandra, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, K6/348, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608/263-5277
Co-Authors:Heidi Donovan, PhD, RN, AOCN, Assistant Professor
The purpose of this presentation is to lay the groundwork for the remaining presentations in this symposium by describing the theoretical underpinnings of the Representational Approach (RA) to patient education. The RA is based on two complementary theories regarding the structure of knowledge and the processes through which knowledge changes. With respect to structure, Leventhal's Common Sense Model focuses on understanding a person's cognitive representations of health problems and the influence of these representations on coping and outcomes. An illness representation is a network of related information (including memories, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, etc) about a health problem. Individuals' representations are critical to patient education because existing representations serve as the framework through which new information is evaluated and made sense of. With respect to the process of change, Hewson's Conceptual Change Model addresses the processes through which learning (conceptual or representational change) occurs. Gaps (missing information), errors (misconceptions), and confusions (unclear or conflated ideas) exist in all representations. It is these gaps, errors, and confusions, as understood within the context of a patient's very individual or unique representation, that can focus a clinician's patient education efforts. Based on these theoretical underpinnings the Representational Approach to patient education was developed. The approach requires eliciting and striving to understand patients' existing representations of illness before giving new information. Through this elicitation the clinician and the patient have the opportunity to recognize gaps, confusions, and misconceptions. Equally important, by understanding the individual's representations of the health problem, the clinician is able to provide new information in a very specific, highly relevant, individualized manner that will be more likely to be accepted by the patient as intelligible, plausible, and fruitful. The remaining presentations in this symposium address the development and testing of three representational interventions that have been based on the RA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTheoretical Underpinnings of the Representational Approach to Patient Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160905-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Theoretical Underpinnings of the Representational Approach to Patient Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward, Sandra, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, K6/348, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608/263-5277</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sward@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heidi Donovan, PhD, RN, AOCN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this presentation is to lay the groundwork for the remaining presentations in this symposium by describing the theoretical underpinnings of the Representational Approach (RA) to patient education. The RA is based on two complementary theories regarding the structure of knowledge and the processes through which knowledge changes. With respect to structure, Leventhal's Common Sense Model focuses on understanding a person's cognitive representations of health problems and the influence of these representations on coping and outcomes. An illness representation is a network of related information (including memories, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, etc) about a health problem. Individuals' representations are critical to patient education because existing representations serve as the framework through which new information is evaluated and made sense of. With respect to the process of change, Hewson's Conceptual Change Model addresses the processes through which learning (conceptual or representational change) occurs. Gaps (missing information), errors (misconceptions), and confusions (unclear or conflated ideas) exist in all representations. It is these gaps, errors, and confusions, as understood within the context of a patient's very individual or unique representation, that can focus a clinician's patient education efforts. Based on these theoretical underpinnings the Representational Approach to patient education was developed. The approach requires eliciting and striving to understand patients' existing representations of illness before giving new information. Through this elicitation the clinician and the patient have the opportunity to recognize gaps, confusions, and misconceptions. Equally important, by understanding the individual's representations of the health problem, the clinician is able to provide new information in a very specific, highly relevant, individualized manner that will be more likely to be accepted by the patient as intelligible, plausible, and fruitful. The remaining presentations in this symposium address the development and testing of three representational interventions that have been based on the RA.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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