2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160906
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experience of Young Women Returning from a Wilderness Expedition
Abstract:
Experience of Young Women Returning from a Wilderness Expedition
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wedin, Helen, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Michigan University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 875 county road 492, Marquette, MI, 49855, USA
Contact Telephone:906 226-4007
The purpose of this proposed descriptive phenomenological study is to explore the experience of young women returning from the remote Arctic territory of Nunavut. Such women transition from an extremely secluded, communal, Canadian wilderness journey of approximately seven weeks duration to a Western lifestyle of advanced technology, high-paced, individualistic living. Preliminary inquiry of expedition voyager returnees points to a significant number of participants reporting moderate or higher levels of anxiety, paralleling similar findings of cross-cultural, returning sojourners who report experiencing a kind of æreverse culture shock'. Psychological distress related to transition between foreign environments and home cultures, has been associated with potential health concerns. Initial exploration into wilderness returnees, primarily obtained through post-expedition interviews, suggests returning travelers experience environmental disconnection, a disjointed sensation of disorientation coupled by mourning of trip members and culture, communication challenges and identity conflict. Qualitative research uncovering the lived experience of reentry adjustment is severely limited though necessary in this age of increased globalization. As ever-increasing numbers of sojourners voyage between multiple cultures, nurses need to be aware of the potential physiologic and mental health issues involved in persons undergoing reentry adjustment. A description of these experiences is paramount to understanding this cross-cultural concept. A conceptual orientation woven from transitional nursing theories and cross-cultural reentry models will influence this dissertation research. Using Giorgi's phenomenological methodology, unsolicited journal entries of approximately 12 female post-expedition participants aged 18-26 years will constitute the basis of data combined with confirmatory internet emails further articulating the experience of returning to a home that is no longer home. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperience of Young Women Returning from a Wilderness Expeditionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160906-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Experience of Young Women Returning from a Wilderness Expedition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wedin, Helen, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 875 county road 492, Marquette, MI, 49855, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">906 226-4007</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hwedin@nmu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this proposed descriptive phenomenological study is to explore the experience of young women returning from the remote Arctic territory of Nunavut. Such women transition from an extremely secluded, communal, Canadian wilderness journey of approximately seven weeks duration to a Western lifestyle of advanced technology, high-paced, individualistic living. Preliminary inquiry of expedition voyager returnees points to a significant number of participants reporting moderate or higher levels of anxiety, paralleling similar findings of cross-cultural, returning sojourners who report experiencing a kind of &aelig;reverse culture shock'. Psychological distress related to transition between foreign environments and home cultures, has been associated with potential health concerns. Initial exploration into wilderness returnees, primarily obtained through post-expedition interviews, suggests returning travelers experience environmental disconnection, a disjointed sensation of disorientation coupled by mourning of trip members and culture, communication challenges and identity conflict. Qualitative research uncovering the lived experience of reentry adjustment is severely limited though necessary in this age of increased globalization. As ever-increasing numbers of sojourners voyage between multiple cultures, nurses need to be aware of the potential physiologic and mental health issues involved in persons undergoing reentry adjustment. A description of these experiences is paramount to understanding this cross-cultural concept. A conceptual orientation woven from transitional nursing theories and cross-cultural reentry models will influence this dissertation research. Using Giorgi's phenomenological methodology, unsolicited journal entries of approximately 12 female post-expedition participants aged 18-26 years will constitute the basis of data combined with confirmatory internet emails further articulating the experience of returning to a home that is no longer home. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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