Diurnal Variations of Fatigue and Dyspnea and other Predictors of Functional Performance in Individuals with COPD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160908
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diurnal Variations of Fatigue and Dyspnea and other Predictors of Functional Performance in Individuals with COPD
Abstract:
Diurnal Variations of Fatigue and Dyspnea and other Predictors of Functional Performance in Individuals with COPD
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Willadsen, Sharon, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Lakeshore Technical College
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, N4506 Cty Rd M, Plymouth, WI, 53073, USA
Contact Telephone:9204678411
A descriptive, correlational design was utilized to collect data through self-report to determine the relationships among fatigue, dyspnea, mood, sleep patterns, percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%), comorbidities and functional performance in individuals with COPD. Additionally, diurnal variations in fatigue and dyspnea were explored utilizing a diary format providing information over five days. Dyspnea was the strongest correlate with functional performance. Morning fatigue was moderately correlated with functional performance. Afternoon and evening fatigue had smaller non-significant correlations with functional performance as well as mood but exhibited relationships in the expected direction. Interestingly, sleep quality was not significantly correlated with sleep patterns. Sleep quality was significantly correlated with fatigue, dyspnea, and functional performance and sleep patterns did not reach significance with either fatigue or dyspnea in the afternoons or evenings. Utilizing stepwise regression, the multidimensional fatigue variable predicted 26% of the variance in functional performance. After closer examination, morning dyspnea within the multidimensional fatigue variable took up all the predicted variance in functional performance. Comorbidities, sleep patterns, sleep quality and FEV1% were excluded from the predictive model. Multicollinearity of sleep quality with the other predictor variables may have prevented this variable from entering the prediction model. Diurnal influences on fatigue and dyspnea were investigated using change scores. The results demonstrated that dyspnea worsened from morning to afternoon as well as from afternoon to evening. The difference was more pronounced from morning to afternoon. Fatigue worsened from morning to afternoon as well as from afternoon to evening. However, the change in fatigue was most pronounced between afternoon and evening. The results of this study identified morning dyspnea as the most significant predictor of functional performance. Nursing interventions to successfully alleviate morning dyspnea or lessen its occurrence will have a positive impact on functional performance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiurnal Variations of Fatigue and Dyspnea and other Predictors of Functional Performance in Individuals with COPDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160908-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diurnal Variations of Fatigue and Dyspnea and other Predictors of Functional Performance in Individuals with COPD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Willadsen, Sharon, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lakeshore Technical College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, N4506 Cty Rd M, Plymouth, WI, 53073, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9204678411</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">swilladsen@excel.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A descriptive, correlational design was utilized to collect data through self-report to determine the relationships among fatigue, dyspnea, mood, sleep patterns, percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%), comorbidities and functional performance in individuals with COPD. Additionally, diurnal variations in fatigue and dyspnea were explored utilizing a diary format providing information over five days. Dyspnea was the strongest correlate with functional performance. Morning fatigue was moderately correlated with functional performance. Afternoon and evening fatigue had smaller non-significant correlations with functional performance as well as mood but exhibited relationships in the expected direction. Interestingly, sleep quality was not significantly correlated with sleep patterns. Sleep quality was significantly correlated with fatigue, dyspnea, and functional performance and sleep patterns did not reach significance with either fatigue or dyspnea in the afternoons or evenings. Utilizing stepwise regression, the multidimensional fatigue variable predicted 26% of the variance in functional performance. After closer examination, morning dyspnea within the multidimensional fatigue variable took up all the predicted variance in functional performance. Comorbidities, sleep patterns, sleep quality and FEV1% were excluded from the predictive model. Multicollinearity of sleep quality with the other predictor variables may have prevented this variable from entering the prediction model. Diurnal influences on fatigue and dyspnea were investigated using change scores. The results demonstrated that dyspnea worsened from morning to afternoon as well as from afternoon to evening. The difference was more pronounced from morning to afternoon. Fatigue worsened from morning to afternoon as well as from afternoon to evening. However, the change in fatigue was most pronounced between afternoon and evening. The results of this study identified morning dyspnea as the most significant predictor of functional performance. Nursing interventions to successfully alleviate morning dyspnea or lessen its occurrence will have a positive impact on functional performance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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