Patterns of Heart Rate Variability in Infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160910
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Heart Rate Variability in Infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects
Abstract:
Patterns of Heart Rate Variability in Infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Winters, Jill, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:(414) 288-3848
Co-Authors:Kathleen Mussatto, BSN, RN, Research Coordinator; Raymond T. Fedderly, MD, Associate Professor; Mary Krolikowski, MSN, RN, Research Coordinator; and Karen A. Pridham, PhD, RN, FAAN, Emeritus Professor
Approximately 1 in 120 infants born has a congenital heart defect (CHD). These anomalies, coupled with the often required surgical interventions, predispose these infants to disruptions in autonomic control. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) data provides a valid, noninvasive index of autonomic nervous system activity. Yet, little is known about HRV in infants with serious CHDs during the first year of life. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine patterns of HRV over the first year of life in this population, and to examine the impact of feeding, a physiological stressor, on HRV. This study is guided by Selye's theory of stress in disease and health. In order to collect ECG data for HRV analysis, all infants had 2-channel GEMS 8500 Holter recorders attached to collect pre-, during, and post-feeding data at 1-, 4-, 8-, and 12-months of age. HRV analysis was performed using a GEMS MARS 5000 Holter analysis system. Frequency domain measures of HRV were determined using power spectral analysis with fast Fourier transform. To date, eight infants have been enrolled in the study. A variety of defects are present including two infants with tetralogy of Fallot, three with ventricular septal defects and interrupted aortic arch, and three with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Three participants are male and five are female. All have had at least one surgical procedure. When compared with baseline measures, reductions in HF HRV were noted both during and after feedings in all 3 diagnostic categories. The most marked reductions, with poorest recovery were noted in those infants with tetralogy of Fallot. Further research is indicated to provide a more thorough understanding of age-, defect-, and surgery-related impact of these cardiac anomalies on cardiac autonomic regulation. This study was funded in part by a grant from the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Heart Rate Variability in Infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160910-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Heart Rate Variability in Infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Jill, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(414) 288-3848</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jill.winters@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Mussatto, BSN, RN, Research Coordinator; Raymond T. Fedderly, MD, Associate Professor; Mary Krolikowski, MSN, RN, Research Coordinator; and Karen A. Pridham, PhD, RN, FAAN, Emeritus Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 1 in 120 infants born has a congenital heart defect (CHD). These anomalies, coupled with the often required surgical interventions, predispose these infants to disruptions in autonomic control. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) data provides a valid, noninvasive index of autonomic nervous system activity. Yet, little is known about HRV in infants with serious CHDs during the first year of life. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine patterns of HRV over the first year of life in this population, and to examine the impact of feeding, a physiological stressor, on HRV. This study is guided by Selye's theory of stress in disease and health. In order to collect ECG data for HRV analysis, all infants had 2-channel GEMS 8500 Holter recorders attached to collect pre-, during, and post-feeding data at 1-, 4-, 8-, and 12-months of age. HRV analysis was performed using a GEMS MARS 5000 Holter analysis system. Frequency domain measures of HRV were determined using power spectral analysis with fast Fourier transform. To date, eight infants have been enrolled in the study. A variety of defects are present including two infants with tetralogy of Fallot, three with ventricular septal defects and interrupted aortic arch, and three with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Three participants are male and five are female. All have had at least one surgical procedure. When compared with baseline measures, reductions in HF HRV were noted both during and after feedings in all 3 diagnostic categories. The most marked reductions, with poorest recovery were noted in those infants with tetralogy of Fallot. Further research is indicated to provide a more thorough understanding of age-, defect-, and surgery-related impact of these cardiac anomalies on cardiac autonomic regulation. This study was funded in part by a grant from the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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