Exploring the Value of an Interprofessional Patient Safety Education Course to Nursing Students: A Mixed Methods Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160915
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the Value of an Interprofessional Patient Safety Education Course to Nursing Students: A Mixed Methods Study
Abstract:
Exploring the Value of an Interprofessional Patient Safety Education Course to Nursing Students: A Mixed Methods Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Abbott, Amy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:2500 California Plaza, Office 193A, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA
Contact Telephone:402.280.2055
Co-Authors:A.A. Abbott, School of Nursing, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; K.T. Fuji, K.A. Galt, K.A. Paschal, School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; A.A. Abbott, K.T. Fuji, K.A. Galt, K.A. Paschal, Center for Health Services Re
Purpose: Educators must prepare students with foundational knowledge to keep patients safe in challenging and ever-changing healthcare environments. Equipping nurses with attitudes, skills, and knowledge to improve patient safety is critical to reducing errors in patient care. The purpose of this pilot study was to understand nursing students' attitudes about the value of interprofessional patient safety education to their professional development and its role in health professions curriculum. Participants: Nursing students enrolled in the interprofessional patient safety course. Methods: An exploratory mixed methods embedded design was used. The qualitative interviews were guided by three key ideas: 1) the role of the nursing profession, the role of the individual nurse, and the role of the nursing student in the context of patient safety; 2) how skills and attitudes learned in the course will change behavior as a student and future practitioner; and 3) recommendations for incorporation of patient safety content into the nursing curriculum. Interviews were transcribed, checked for accuracy, and in vivo coded by each investigator. Quantitative data was analyzed using information obtained from a) the standard course evaluation questionnaire; b) final examination performance; c) final case study assignment performance; and d) classroom assessment techniques. The quantitative data will provide a contextual framework to compare nursing students with others in the course. After the qualitative and quantitative data are analyzed, final results will be integrated and interpreted in context in the interdisciplinary course environment. Results: Findings will inform educators about the meaning of this interprofessional patient safety education experience to professional nursing development beyond traditional quantitative methods of course evaluations and student performance scores. A values-oriented patient safety education framework that is responsive to nursing students in the health science student's curricula may enrich opportunities for nursing student recruitment to the course.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the Value of an Interprofessional Patient Safety Education Course to Nursing Students: A Mixed Methods Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160915-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring the Value of an Interprofessional Patient Safety Education Course to Nursing Students: A Mixed Methods Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Abbott, Amy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2500 California Plaza, Office 193A, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.280.2055</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aabbott@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.A. Abbott, School of Nursing, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; K.T. Fuji, K.A. Galt, K.A. Paschal, School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; A.A. Abbott, K.T. Fuji, K.A. Galt, K.A. Paschal, Center for Health Services Re</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Educators must prepare students with foundational knowledge to keep patients safe in challenging and ever-changing healthcare environments. Equipping nurses with attitudes, skills, and knowledge to improve patient safety is critical to reducing errors in patient care. The purpose of this pilot study was to understand nursing students' attitudes about the value of interprofessional patient safety education to their professional development and its role in health professions curriculum. Participants: Nursing students enrolled in the interprofessional patient safety course. Methods: An exploratory mixed methods embedded design was used. The qualitative interviews were guided by three key ideas: 1) the role of the nursing profession, the role of the individual nurse, and the role of the nursing student in the context of patient safety; 2) how skills and attitudes learned in the course will change behavior as a student and future practitioner; and 3) recommendations for incorporation of patient safety content into the nursing curriculum. Interviews were transcribed, checked for accuracy, and in vivo coded by each investigator. Quantitative data was analyzed using information obtained from a) the standard course evaluation questionnaire; b) final examination performance; c) final case study assignment performance; and d) classroom assessment techniques. The quantitative data will provide a contextual framework to compare nursing students with others in the course. After the qualitative and quantitative data are analyzed, final results will be integrated and interpreted in context in the interdisciplinary course environment. Results: Findings will inform educators about the meaning of this interprofessional patient safety education experience to professional nursing development beyond traditional quantitative methods of course evaluations and student performance scores. A values-oriented patient safety education framework that is responsive to nursing students in the health science student's curricula may enrich opportunities for nursing student recruitment to the course.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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