2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160916
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Care Transitions: Patient and Provider Perspectives
Abstract:
Care Transitions: Patient and Provider Perspectives
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Abbott, Amy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:2500 California Plaza, Office 193A, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA
Contact Telephone:402.280.2055
Co-Authors:A.A. Abbott, J. Norris, School of Nursing, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; K.T. Fuji, School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; A.A. Abbott, K.T. Fuji, J. Norris, Center for Health Services Research and Patient Safety, C
Purpose: To describe patients' and providers' experiences in care transitions through one community's healthcare delivery organizations. Conceptual Framework: A framework was generated from the data: Barriers, Consequences and Strategies for Improvement in Transition Processes. Participants: Professionals (N = 19) included: nurses, pharmacists, physicians, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists, social workers, case managers, and rehabilitation service providers. Professionals were in practice for an average of 16 years. Patients (N =19) and family members described transition experiences from hospitals to skilled, home or self care with 13 reporting these experiences in the past year. Methods: Snowball sampling was used to invite participants to focus groups about their understanding and experiences of care transitions. Qualitative data emerged from the focus groups based on broad questions about experiences and perceptions. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using In Vivo 8 software. Qualitative narrative analysis was completed. Results: Findings centered on lack of shared knowledge between patients and professionals. The responsibilities described by professionals differed from patients' expectations. Though many facilities have policies in place for transitioning patients across levels of care, qualitative themes suggested that no ideal practice model exists. Numerous barriers to care transitions exist and result in negative consequences for providers and patients. Successful strategies to help improve outcomes were identified from various providers' and patients' perspectives. Conclusions: The lack of a well implemented set of transition processes resulted from time constraints, poor communication, and consultation delays. These barriers resulted in inadequate preparations for discharge to skilled or self-care and to readmissions. Further studies to develop or elaborate on successful strategies in various agencies are needed to improve care transition processes. Implications: Nurses are in a pivotal role to improve care transition processes through earlier patient teaching and evaluation and improved communications with providers, patients and families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCare Transitions: Patient and Provider Perspectivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160916-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Care Transitions: Patient and Provider Perspectives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Abbott, Amy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2500 California Plaza, Office 193A, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.280.2055</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aabbott@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.A. Abbott, J. Norris, School of Nursing, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; K.T. Fuji, School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; A.A. Abbott, K.T. Fuji, J. Norris, Center for Health Services Research and Patient Safety, C</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe patients' and providers' experiences in care transitions through one community's healthcare delivery organizations. Conceptual Framework: A framework was generated from the data: Barriers, Consequences and Strategies for Improvement in Transition Processes. Participants: Professionals (N = 19) included: nurses, pharmacists, physicians, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists, social workers, case managers, and rehabilitation service providers. Professionals were in practice for an average of 16 years. Patients (N =19) and family members described transition experiences from hospitals to skilled, home or self care with 13 reporting these experiences in the past year. Methods: Snowball sampling was used to invite participants to focus groups about their understanding and experiences of care transitions. Qualitative data emerged from the focus groups based on broad questions about experiences and perceptions. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using In Vivo 8 software. Qualitative narrative analysis was completed. Results: Findings centered on lack of shared knowledge between patients and professionals. The responsibilities described by professionals differed from patients' expectations. Though many facilities have policies in place for transitioning patients across levels of care, qualitative themes suggested that no ideal practice model exists. Numerous barriers to care transitions exist and result in negative consequences for providers and patients. Successful strategies to help improve outcomes were identified from various providers' and patients' perspectives. Conclusions: The lack of a well implemented set of transition processes resulted from time constraints, poor communication, and consultation delays. These barriers resulted in inadequate preparations for discharge to skilled or self-care and to readmissions. Further studies to develop or elaborate on successful strategies in various agencies are needed to improve care transition processes. Implications: Nurses are in a pivotal role to improve care transition processes through earlier patient teaching and evaluation and improved communications with providers, patients and families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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