2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160917
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Body Size Perception, BMI, and Smoking Behaviors: An Exploratory Study
Abstract:
Women's Body Size Perception, BMI, and Smoking Behaviors: An Exploratory Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Abbott-Anderson, Kristen
P.I. Institution Name:UW-Madison
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:7203 Midtown Rd, #306, Madison, WI, 53719, USA
Contact Telephone:608-274-1469
Co-Authors:K.C. Abbott-Anderson, P.J. Myhre, S.M. Heidrich, M.S. Ching, M.A. Ritchie, P.K. Pletsch, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin: Madison, Madison, WI;
Purpose: To explore relationships among pregnant women's perception of their body size, actual body size (BMI), and health behaviors related to smoking. Conceptual Framework: A social cognitive perspective suggests women's body size perception influences health behavior. In previous research, women overestimated perceived body and used smoking to control weight. Subjects: Forty four pregnant women who quit smoking during pregnancy were interviewed at 28 - 32 weeks gestation and one month postpartum. Their mean age was 27, 40.9% were African American, and 83.7% had high school or greater education. Methods: At each interview, women completed scales: Cohen Stress, Edinburgh Postpartum Depression, and self-efficacy/self confidence for smoking cessation, then chose standardized body silhouettes (Williamson, 2000) representing pre-pregnant body size, ideal body size, and realistically attainable postpartum body size. Pre-pregnancy height/weight measures were by self-report. Independent coders assigned each body silhouette to categories of underweight (BMI < 19), normal (BMI 19 - 24), overweight (BMI 25-29), and obese (BMI equal to or greater than 30). Inter-rater agreement was 98.6%. Results: Pre-pregnancy BMI ranged from 17.4 to 50.22; 52.3% were overweight or obese by BMI. There were significant differences between overweight/obese women (BMI equal to or greater than 25) and normal weight women in selection of silhouettes for pre-pregnant body size and realistically attainable body size postpartum. 100% of overweight/obese women chose silhouettes depicting normal weight for each. Normal weight women chose silhouettes consistent with their BMI. No significant relationships were found between perceived body size and tobacco usage, stress, depression, self-efficacy/self-confidence, race, economic status, age or educational level. Conclusions: In contrast with previous studies, overweight/obese women perceived body size as smaller than their actual BMI. If so, then they may be less likely to engage in health behaviors related to weight management. Future research should explore relationship between body size perception, obesity, and health promotion behaviors. Acknowledgments: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Body Size Perception, BMI, and Smoking Behaviors: An Exploratory Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160917-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Body Size Perception, BMI, and Smoking Behaviors: An Exploratory Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Abbott-Anderson, Kristen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UW-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7203 Midtown Rd, #306, Madison, WI, 53719, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-274-1469</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kcanderson2@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.C. Abbott-Anderson, P.J. Myhre, S.M. Heidrich, M.S. Ching, M.A. Ritchie, P.K. Pletsch, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin: Madison, Madison, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore relationships among pregnant women's perception of their body size, actual body size (BMI), and health behaviors related to smoking. Conceptual Framework: A social cognitive perspective suggests women's body size perception influences health behavior. In previous research, women overestimated perceived body and used smoking to control weight. Subjects: Forty four pregnant women who quit smoking during pregnancy were interviewed at 28 - 32 weeks gestation and one month postpartum. Their mean age was 27, 40.9% were African American, and 83.7% had high school or greater education. Methods: At each interview, women completed scales: Cohen Stress, Edinburgh Postpartum Depression, and self-efficacy/self confidence for smoking cessation, then chose standardized body silhouettes (Williamson, 2000) representing pre-pregnant body size, ideal body size, and realistically attainable postpartum body size. Pre-pregnancy height/weight measures were by self-report. Independent coders assigned each body silhouette to categories of underweight (BMI &lt; 19), normal (BMI 19 - 24), overweight (BMI 25-29), and obese (BMI equal to or greater than 30). Inter-rater agreement was 98.6%. Results: Pre-pregnancy BMI ranged from 17.4 to 50.22; 52.3% were overweight or obese by BMI. There were significant differences between overweight/obese women (BMI equal to or greater than 25) and normal weight women in selection of silhouettes for pre-pregnant body size and realistically attainable body size postpartum. 100% of overweight/obese women chose silhouettes depicting normal weight for each. Normal weight women chose silhouettes consistent with their BMI. No significant relationships were found between perceived body size and tobacco usage, stress, depression, self-efficacy/self-confidence, race, economic status, age or educational level. Conclusions: In contrast with previous studies, overweight/obese women perceived body size as smaller than their actual BMI. If so, then they may be less likely to engage in health behaviors related to weight management. Future research should explore relationship between body size perception, obesity, and health promotion behaviors. Acknowledgments: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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