2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160919
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wandering and the Physical Environment
Abstract:
Wandering and the Physical Environment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Algase, Donna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:400 N. Ingalls Rd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734-763-0001
Co-Authors:D. Algase, L. Yao, C. Antonakos, , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; E. Beattie, , Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park, Queensland, AUSTRALIA; C. Beel-Bates, , Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI;
Purpose of the study: Guided by the need-driven dementia-compromised behavior (NDB) model, this study examined influences of the physical environment on wandering behavior. Design and methods: Using a descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design, 122 wanderers from 22 nursing homes and six assisted living facilities were videotaped for ten to twelve 20-minute observations. Within observations, wandering episodes were timed for rate and duration; data on light, sound, temperature and humidity levels, as well as location and crowding were collected three times; and two aspects of environmental ambiance were rated. For analysis observations (n = 1060) were categorized (positive/negative for wandering) and participants were classified by type (classic, moderate, or subclinical) based on rate and duration data. Associations between environmental variables and wandering were evaluated with Chi-square and t-tests; the model was evaluated using logistic regression for the overall sample and each wandering type. Results: Most (80%) wandering occurred in one of four locations (resident's own room, dayrooms, hallways, dining rooms). When observed in other residents' rooms, hallways, shower/baths, or off-unit locations, wanderers were most likely (60-92% of observations) to wander. Logistic regression revealed a good fit to the model overall (LR x2 (5) = 50.38, p < .0001) and by wandering type; significant variables and odds ratios varied across types. Implications: Location, light, sound, proximity of others, and the engaging and soothing qualities of an environment are associated with wandering and may serve to inform designs of environments and care practices aimed to modify it. Results also support the NDB model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWandering and the Physical Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160919-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wandering and the Physical Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Algase, Donna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 N. Ingalls Rd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-763-0001</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dalgase@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Algase, L. Yao, C. Antonakos, , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; E. Beattie, , Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park, Queensland, AUSTRALIA; C. Beel-Bates, , Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose of the study: Guided by the need-driven dementia-compromised behavior (NDB) model, this study examined influences of the physical environment on wandering behavior. Design and methods: Using a descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design, 122 wanderers from 22 nursing homes and six assisted living facilities were videotaped for ten to twelve 20-minute observations. Within observations, wandering episodes were timed for rate and duration; data on light, sound, temperature and humidity levels, as well as location and crowding were collected three times; and two aspects of environmental ambiance were rated. For analysis observations (n = 1060) were categorized (positive/negative for wandering) and participants were classified by type (classic, moderate, or subclinical) based on rate and duration data. Associations between environmental variables and wandering were evaluated with Chi-square and t-tests; the model was evaluated using logistic regression for the overall sample and each wandering type. Results: Most (80%) wandering occurred in one of four locations (resident's own room, dayrooms, hallways, dining rooms). When observed in other residents' rooms, hallways, shower/baths, or off-unit locations, wanderers were most likely (60-92% of observations) to wander. Logistic regression revealed a good fit to the model overall (LR x2 (5) = 50.38, p &lt; .0001) and by wandering type; significant variables and odds ratios varied across types. Implications: Location, light, sound, proximity of others, and the engaging and soothing qualities of an environment are associated with wandering and may serve to inform designs of environments and care practices aimed to modify it. Results also support the NDB model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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