2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160920
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Perceptions in Hypertensive African Americans
Abstract:
Illness Perceptions in Hypertensive African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Allen, Wilfred, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:40575 Paisley Circle, Novi, MI, 48377, USA
Contact Telephone:586 854-2508
Co-Authors:S.M. Pickett, W. Allen, M. Franklin, R.M. Peters, , Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Problem & Purpose: One in three African Americans has hypertension (HTN) with self-care behaviors contributing to this high prevalence. Self-Care is influenced by illness perceptions including beliefs about the illnesses' timeline, consequences, personal control, treatment control, illness coherence, cyclical symptoms and emotional representations. The role of illness perception is not well studied in hypertensive African Americans. This study examined the relationship of illness perceptions to self-care behaviors needed to control blood pressure (BP) and actual recorded BP. Theory: Constructs of illness representation were integrated as indicators of self-care agency (SCA) within self-care deficit nursing theory. Methods: A sample of 111 hypertensive community-dwelling African Americans were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Questionnaires included the Hypertension Perception scale (subscales alphas ranged from .59 - .83); and BP Self-Care (Alpha=.68); BP was recorded using the average of two BP measurements using an Omron automated device. Results: Participants included 54% women (n=60) and 46% men (n=51) who were middle-aged (M=52, SD=9.0) and fairly well educated (M=13.0, SD=2.8). Most of the participants had limited annual income (56% < $15,000). There were no significant gender differences on any of the HTN Perception subscales. None of the seven subscales were significantly correlated with BP self-care. Perception of HTN as a chronic illness was inversely related to average diastolic BP (r= -.22, p=.02). Clinically and statistically significant correlations were noted between various perception subscales. Implications: HTN Perceptions as a component of SCA was not significantly associated with self-care, but increased perception regarding the chronicity of HTN was associated with decreased diastolic BP. These findings are inconsistent with the postulated relationships between SCA, self-care, and health. Of clinical relevance was increased perceptions related to the chronicity of HTN and the cyclical nature of symptoms was significantly associated with decreased perceptions of personal and treatment control. Further research is needed to determine the role and significance of illness perceptions related to behaviors needed for BP control.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIllness Perceptions in Hypertensive African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160920-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Illness Perceptions in Hypertensive African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allen, Wilfred, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">40575 Paisley Circle, Novi, MI, 48377, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">586 854-2508</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ar7321@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.M. Pickett, W. Allen, M. Franklin, R.M. Peters, , Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem &amp; Purpose: One in three African Americans has hypertension (HTN) with self-care behaviors contributing to this high prevalence. Self-Care is influenced by illness perceptions including beliefs about the illnesses' timeline, consequences, personal control, treatment control, illness coherence, cyclical symptoms and emotional representations. The role of illness perception is not well studied in hypertensive African Americans. This study examined the relationship of illness perceptions to self-care behaviors needed to control blood pressure (BP) and actual recorded BP. Theory: Constructs of illness representation were integrated as indicators of self-care agency (SCA) within self-care deficit nursing theory. Methods: A sample of 111 hypertensive community-dwelling African Americans were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Questionnaires included the Hypertension Perception scale (subscales alphas ranged from .59 - .83); and BP Self-Care (Alpha=.68); BP was recorded using the average of two BP measurements using an Omron automated device. Results: Participants included 54% women (n=60) and 46% men (n=51) who were middle-aged (M=52, SD=9.0) and fairly well educated (M=13.0, SD=2.8). Most of the participants had limited annual income (56% &lt; $15,000). There were no significant gender differences on any of the HTN Perception subscales. None of the seven subscales were significantly correlated with BP self-care. Perception of HTN as a chronic illness was inversely related to average diastolic BP (r= -.22, p=.02). Clinically and statistically significant correlations were noted between various perception subscales. Implications: HTN Perceptions as a component of SCA was not significantly associated with self-care, but increased perception regarding the chronicity of HTN was associated with decreased diastolic BP. These findings are inconsistent with the postulated relationships between SCA, self-care, and health. Of clinical relevance was increased perceptions related to the chronicity of HTN and the cyclical nature of symptoms was significantly associated with decreased perceptions of personal and treatment control. Further research is needed to determine the role and significance of illness perceptions related to behaviors needed for BP control.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:12:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:12:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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