2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160925
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Work-Related Trauma Among Nurses and Other Professionals
Abstract:
Examining Work-Related Trauma Among Nurses and Other Professionals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Baxter, Jennifer, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:3550 N Lake Shore Drive #204, #204, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA
Contact Telephone:917 4148214
Co-Authors:J.S. Baxter, Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Purpose: Improving the workplace environment is an important strategy to retain nurses and enable best practices. Examining work-related trauma across professions can provide valuable lessons toward workplace improvements. The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to examine the state of the evidence regarding professionals who encounter patients and clients experiencing trauma. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The concept of "vicarious traumatization" provided a framework to examine the effect of caring for patients and clients suffering from trauma. Subjects: "Occupational stress" and "trauma" were searched using CINAHL and PsychINFO. Inclusion criteria were: (a) written in English, (b) published between 1999 and 2009, (c) described experience of professionals exposed to patients/clients experiencing trauma, and (d) available electronically. Eighty-four publications were critically appraised. Method: Data abstracted included: author/year, design, purpose, profession of interest, trauma source, sample and setting, method, findings, strengths and limitations, and implications. Results: Almost half of the studies focused on nursing (n=18), or medicine/paramedicine (n=17) as a profession of interest. Other professions of focus included mental health (n=13), police and forensic (n=8), social work (n=7), and firefighting (n=6). Most of research on nurses was in areas of oncology/palliative care, emergency/ICU, and OR nursing. Reactions to trauma included compassion fatigue/stress, secondary victimization, secondary traumatic stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, burnout and vicarious trauma. Levels of control, social support, experience, sensitivity, empathy, guilt, and awareness were shown to affect the professional's reaction and response. Conclusions: Professionals who encounter patients and clients experiencing trauma are at risk for psychological and physical problems. Evidence about trauma in the nursing workforce is limited. Future research needs to examine the experience of trauma among nurses, the impact on their personal lives, their ability to effectively do their jobs and the impact on retention in the workforce.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Work-Related Trauma Among Nurses and Other Professionalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160925-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Work-Related Trauma Among Nurses and Other Professionals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baxter, Jennifer, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3550 N Lake Shore Drive #204, #204, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">917 4148214</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbaxte2@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.S. Baxter, Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Improving the workplace environment is an important strategy to retain nurses and enable best practices. Examining work-related trauma across professions can provide valuable lessons toward workplace improvements. The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to examine the state of the evidence regarding professionals who encounter patients and clients experiencing trauma. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The concept of &quot;vicarious traumatization&quot; provided a framework to examine the effect of caring for patients and clients suffering from trauma. Subjects: &quot;Occupational stress&quot; and &quot;trauma&quot; were searched using CINAHL and PsychINFO. Inclusion criteria were: (a) written in English, (b) published between 1999 and 2009, (c) described experience of professionals exposed to patients/clients experiencing trauma, and (d) available electronically. Eighty-four publications were critically appraised. Method: Data abstracted included: author/year, design, purpose, profession of interest, trauma source, sample and setting, method, findings, strengths and limitations, and implications. Results: Almost half of the studies focused on nursing (n=18), or medicine/paramedicine (n=17) as a profession of interest. Other professions of focus included mental health (n=13), police and forensic (n=8), social work (n=7), and firefighting (n=6). Most of research on nurses was in areas of oncology/palliative care, emergency/ICU, and OR nursing. Reactions to trauma included compassion fatigue/stress, secondary victimization, secondary traumatic stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, burnout and vicarious trauma. Levels of control, social support, experience, sensitivity, empathy, guilt, and awareness were shown to affect the professional's reaction and response. Conclusions: Professionals who encounter patients and clients experiencing trauma are at risk for psychological and physical problems. Evidence about trauma in the nursing workforce is limited. Future research needs to examine the experience of trauma among nurses, the impact on their personal lives, their ability to effectively do their jobs and the impact on retention in the workforce.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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