Interaction Between Caregivers and Demented Residents Measured with Barnard's Nursing-Child Assessment Feeding Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160926
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interaction Between Caregivers and Demented Residents Measured with Barnard's Nursing-Child Assessment Feeding Scale
Abstract:
Interaction Between Caregivers and Demented Residents Measured with Barnard's Nursing-Child Assessment Feeding Scale
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Beel-Bates, Cynthia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Grand Valley State University
Title:Kirkhof College of Nursing
Contact Address:301 Michigan St. NE Room 380, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA
Contact Telephone:616-331-5774
Co-Authors:C.A. Beel-Bates, J. French-Rogers, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids , MI; P. Stephenson, Statistics, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids , MI; C. Nochera, Biomedical Sciences, Grand Valley State University, G
Nursing home residents with advanced dementia typically need help with eating. Lack of positive person-to-person interaction, a critical component of the feeding/eating process, can contribute to residents' weight loss and/or dehydration. Although evidence supports the importance of mealtime interactions, approaches for measuring and ultimately coaching caregiver desired behaviors are scarce. Based on literature reviews regarding interaction at mealtimes,two researchers cited the need for a reliable, valid instrument to measure these interactions. This descriptive study explored the appropriateness of Barnard's Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale(NCAFS) as a measure of dyadic interaction between caregivers and demented residents. An adaptation of Barnard and Eyres' (1979) Child Health Assessment Model (CHAM) was the conceptual framework for the study. Residents inclusion criteria were: (a) living in the nursing home; (b) feedings totally provided or assisted by caregivers; (c)ability to communicate through signs, gestures,or sounds, and to usually be understood; (d) adequate corrected vision; (e) some ability to physically move arms/hands; and (f) diagnosis of dementia from degenerative brain disease or stroke. Caregiver criteria were: (a) feed a qualified resident and (b) give signed consent to be observed during the feeding. In two Midwest nursing homes, 38 residents and their 128 caregivers were observed by one certified observer of the NCAFS during 228 regular meals. Internal consistency/reliability coefficients measured by Cronbach's alpha reflect "moderate to good" consistency among the items (Portney & Watkins,2009,p.525). Correlation studies were done between scores from the first and second days of observations. The correlation of caregivers' NCAFS scores showed a moderate relationship (r=.609) but no relationship in contingency scores. Residents' NCAFS scores and contingency scores showed moderate to high correlations (r =.73 and r = .685) indicating a relationship between the two days' scores. Caregivers' and residents' NCAFS scores showed positive correlations. NCAFS' validity and reliability for measurement of feeding interactions in this population could be useful in the assessment and subsequent staff education to improve life for demented nursing home residents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteraction Between Caregivers and Demented Residents Measured with Barnard's Nursing-Child Assessment Feeding Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160926-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interaction Between Caregivers and Demented Residents Measured with Barnard's Nursing-Child Assessment Feeding Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beel-Bates, Cynthia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grand Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Kirkhof College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">301 Michigan St. NE Room 380, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-331-5774</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beelbatc@gvsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.A. Beel-Bates, J. French-Rogers, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids , MI; P. Stephenson, Statistics, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids , MI; C. Nochera, Biomedical Sciences, Grand Valley State University, G</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing home residents with advanced dementia typically need help with eating. Lack of positive person-to-person interaction, a critical component of the feeding/eating process, can contribute to residents' weight loss and/or dehydration. Although evidence supports the importance of mealtime interactions, approaches for measuring and ultimately coaching caregiver desired behaviors are scarce. Based on literature reviews regarding interaction at mealtimes,two researchers cited the need for a reliable, valid instrument to measure these interactions. This descriptive study explored the appropriateness of Barnard's Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale(NCAFS) as a measure of dyadic interaction between caregivers and demented residents. An adaptation of Barnard and Eyres' (1979) Child Health Assessment Model (CHAM) was the conceptual framework for the study. Residents inclusion criteria were: (a) living in the nursing home; (b) feedings totally provided or assisted by caregivers; (c)ability to communicate through signs, gestures,or sounds, and to usually be understood; (d) adequate corrected vision; (e) some ability to physically move arms/hands; and (f) diagnosis of dementia from degenerative brain disease or stroke. Caregiver criteria were: (a) feed a qualified resident and (b) give signed consent to be observed during the feeding. In two Midwest nursing homes, 38 residents and their 128 caregivers were observed by one certified observer of the NCAFS during 228 regular meals. Internal consistency/reliability coefficients measured by Cronbach's alpha reflect &quot;moderate to good&quot; consistency among the items (Portney &amp; Watkins,2009,p.525). Correlation studies were done between scores from the first and second days of observations. The correlation of caregivers' NCAFS scores showed a moderate relationship (r=.609) but no relationship in contingency scores. Residents' NCAFS scores and contingency scores showed moderate to high correlations (r =.73 and r = .685) indicating a relationship between the two days' scores. Caregivers' and residents' NCAFS scores showed positive correlations. NCAFS' validity and reliability for measurement of feeding interactions in this population could be useful in the assessment and subsequent staff education to improve life for demented nursing home residents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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