2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160928
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Trend of Adiposity Rebound in the US Children from 1999-2006
Abstract:
Trend of Adiposity Rebound in the US Children from 1999-2006
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Boonpleng, Wannaporn, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:, Chicago, IL, 60607, USA
Contact Telephone:31245161111
Co-Authors:W. Boonpleng, C. Park, B.J. McElmurry, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Aims: Adiposity rebound (AR) is used as an indicator to predict obesity in adulthood. AR body mass index increases in infancy and then decreases to a lowest point between 5 and 7 years of age before increasing again until early adulthood. For U.S children, the age of AR has been studied. However, no prior research has been reported using national data. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the timing of AR for U.S children and evaluate the trends in AR timing in the past eight years using four National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods: Data from NHANES 1999-2006 of 9,540 children age 2-12 years were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Nonparametric regression analysis was employed to examine the timing of AR. Results: Age at AR remained the same at the age of 4 years in the last eight years (figure 1). Among girls, the age of AR was inconsistent and fluctuated from the age of 4 to 5 years throughout 4 surveys. Change in AR has occurred only among boys. Compared to 1999, the timing of AR has shifted to earlier ages. AR occurred at the age of 3 years (mean BMI 16.21 +/- 1.8) in 2006 compared to 5 years (mean BMI 16.13 +/- 2.18) in 1999. Conclusion: Gender differences in adiposity rebound were identified. Within the U.S children, the AR was earlier in boys than girls. In the last eight years, the timing of AR has shifted to earlier ages among boys. The differences in timing for AR by gender should be considered in planning early and timely intervention efforts to prevent childhood obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTrend of Adiposity Rebound in the US Children from 1999-2006en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160928-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Trend of Adiposity Rebound in the US Children from 1999-2006</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boonpleng, Wannaporn, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Chicago, IL, 60607, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">31245161111</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wboonp3@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W. Boonpleng, C. Park, B.J. McElmurry, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: Adiposity rebound (AR) is used as an indicator to predict obesity in adulthood. AR body mass index increases in infancy and then decreases to a lowest point between 5 and 7 years of age before increasing again until early adulthood. For U.S children, the age of AR has been studied. However, no prior research has been reported using national data. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the timing of AR for U.S children and evaluate the trends in AR timing in the past eight years using four National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods: Data from NHANES 1999-2006 of 9,540 children age 2-12 years were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Nonparametric regression analysis was employed to examine the timing of AR. Results: Age at AR remained the same at the age of 4 years in the last eight years (figure 1). Among girls, the age of AR was inconsistent and fluctuated from the age of 4 to 5 years throughout 4 surveys. Change in AR has occurred only among boys. Compared to 1999, the timing of AR has shifted to earlier ages. AR occurred at the age of 3 years (mean BMI 16.21 +/- 1.8) in 2006 compared to 5 years (mean BMI 16.13 +/- 2.18) in 1999. Conclusion: Gender differences in adiposity rebound were identified. Within the U.S children, the AR was earlier in boys than girls. In the last eight years, the timing of AR has shifted to earlier ages among boys. The differences in timing for AR by gender should be considered in planning early and timely intervention efforts to prevent childhood obesity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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