An Introduction to 3-D Simulation in a Virtual World: Second Life for Online Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160929
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Introduction to 3-D Simulation in a Virtual World: Second Life for Online Education
Abstract:
An Introduction to 3-D Simulation in a Virtual World: Second Life for Online Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Brixey, Juliana, PhD, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas School of Nursing
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Boulevard, MS 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913.588.1671
Co-Authors:J.J. Brixey, J.J. Warren, , University of Kansas School of Nursing, Kansas City, KS;
Purpose: Simulations utilizing high fidelity mannequins are commonly used in nursing education. The simulations help students gain skills and expertise before engaging in real world situations. Few nurse educators use 3-D immersive technologies such as Second Life (SL) to create simulations for teaching and learning activities. Second Life is an interactive virtual environment populated by resident avatars. An avatar is an animated 3-D character that can interact with other avatars through gestures, instant message, and voice chat. The purpose of this project is to report SL simulations created for online health informatics students. Methods: Computer and SL requirements. Students must have Internet access and computer specifications that meet the minimum requirements specified by SL. Students establish a SL user account and create an avatar. A microphone and headset is required for voice chat. Course assignments: Students participate in various simulation SL activities for each informatics course. Activities include podium and poster presentations, participating in course discussions guided by faculty, searching for health information, and designing a clinical information system for a simulated community living center. Results: Simulations in SL have enhanced student learning and have been effectively integrated into the informatics curriculum. Conclusion: The 3-D shared environment provides students a space to interact, problem-solve, and complete projects. The experience of professional community is created through SL interactions. These relationships can be maintained beyond class activities through continued membership in SL. The voice chat is a valued feature of SL as students and faculty hear the sound and inflections of each voice. This feature augments the interaction for the faculty and students. The full potential for the use of 3-D technologies such as Second Life has yet to be realized for the purpose of teaching and learning. It is important that educators become active participants in the design and evaluation of simulations created in virtual environments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Introduction to 3-D Simulation in a Virtual World: Second Life for Online Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160929-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Introduction to 3-D Simulation in a Virtual World: Second Life for Online Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brixey, Juliana, PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Boulevard, MS 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913.588.1671</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbrixey@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.J. Brixey, J.J. Warren, , University of Kansas School of Nursing, Kansas City, KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Simulations utilizing high fidelity mannequins are commonly used in nursing education. The simulations help students gain skills and expertise before engaging in real world situations. Few nurse educators use 3-D immersive technologies such as Second Life (SL) to create simulations for teaching and learning activities. Second Life is an interactive virtual environment populated by resident avatars. An avatar is an animated 3-D character that can interact with other avatars through gestures, instant message, and voice chat. The purpose of this project is to report SL simulations created for online health informatics students. Methods: Computer and SL requirements. Students must have Internet access and computer specifications that meet the minimum requirements specified by SL. Students establish a SL user account and create an avatar. A microphone and headset is required for voice chat. Course assignments: Students participate in various simulation SL activities for each informatics course. Activities include podium and poster presentations, participating in course discussions guided by faculty, searching for health information, and designing a clinical information system for a simulated community living center. Results: Simulations in SL have enhanced student learning and have been effectively integrated into the informatics curriculum. Conclusion: The 3-D shared environment provides students a space to interact, problem-solve, and complete projects. The experience of professional community is created through SL interactions. These relationships can be maintained beyond class activities through continued membership in SL. The voice chat is a valued feature of SL as students and faculty hear the sound and inflections of each voice. This feature augments the interaction for the faculty and students. The full potential for the use of 3-D technologies such as Second Life has yet to be realized for the purpose of teaching and learning. It is important that educators become active participants in the design and evaluation of simulations created in virtual environments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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