Relationship of Age, Comorbidities, Cancer Site and Cancer Stage to Physical Functioning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160931
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Age, Comorbidities, Cancer Site and Cancer Stage to Physical Functioning
Abstract:
Relationship of Age, Comorbidities, Cancer Site and Cancer Stage to Physical Functioning
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Burritt, Karen, PhD-c
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Colllege of Nursing
Contact Address:1496 Fero Ave NE, Lowell, MI, 49331, USA
Contact Telephone:616-676-3223
Co-Authors:K.R. Burritt, B. Given, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing , MI; C. Given, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing , MI;
Problem: Loss of physical functioning during cancer therapy has many ramifications including decreases in Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), increased risk for falls, and self care deficits. Identifying factors related to decrease physical functioning allows both formal and informal caregivers to anticipate changes in patient care needs. The purpose of this research is to determine the associations between age, comorbidity, cancer site, cancer stage and physical functioning at baseline, 10 weeks and 16 weeks in patients with a new cancer diagnosis. Theoretical Framework: Physical function has been identified as one domain of HRQoL. Within the Wilson and Cleary Model, physical functioning is considered an intermediate outcome contributing to HRQoL. Method/Design: This study is a secondary analysis of data from two NIH funded randomized control trials designed to test the effect of nursing interventions to manage patient symptoms. The sample for this study was 712 patients with solid tumor cancers. Physical functioning was measured at baseline,10 and 16 weeks in patients receiving cancer treatment. Analysis/Findings: ANCOVA was used to determine which of the independent variables predicted PF at baseline, 10 and 16 weeks. At all time points, increasing levels of comorbidity was a significant predictor of poorer PF outcomes. Cancer site was significant predictor of PF at baseline and 10 weeks but not at 16 weeks. Poorer PF at 16 weeks was associated with higher cancer stage. Age was not a significant predictor of PF at any time point. Using MANCOVA analysis, time had no effect on PF. Nursing Implications: Understanding which patients are most likely to have difficulty with physical functioning facilitates early identification of self care deficits and risks for falls. Patients with higher levels of comorbidity, especially when associated with advanced cancer stage and breast cancer should be assessed carefully for PF needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Age, Comorbidities, Cancer Site and Cancer Stage to Physical Functioningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160931-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of Age, Comorbidities, Cancer Site and Cancer Stage to Physical Functioning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burritt, Karen, PhD-c</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Colllege of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1496 Fero Ave NE, Lowell, MI, 49331, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-676-3223</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">burrittk@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.R. Burritt, B. Given, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing , MI; C. Given, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing , MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Loss of physical functioning during cancer therapy has many ramifications including decreases in Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), increased risk for falls, and self care deficits. Identifying factors related to decrease physical functioning allows both formal and informal caregivers to anticipate changes in patient care needs. The purpose of this research is to determine the associations between age, comorbidity, cancer site, cancer stage and physical functioning at baseline, 10 weeks and 16 weeks in patients with a new cancer diagnosis. Theoretical Framework: Physical function has been identified as one domain of HRQoL. Within the Wilson and Cleary Model, physical functioning is considered an intermediate outcome contributing to HRQoL. Method/Design: This study is a secondary analysis of data from two NIH funded randomized control trials designed to test the effect of nursing interventions to manage patient symptoms. The sample for this study was 712 patients with solid tumor cancers. Physical functioning was measured at baseline,10 and 16 weeks in patients receiving cancer treatment. Analysis/Findings: ANCOVA was used to determine which of the independent variables predicted PF at baseline, 10 and 16 weeks. At all time points, increasing levels of comorbidity was a significant predictor of poorer PF outcomes. Cancer site was significant predictor of PF at baseline and 10 weeks but not at 16 weeks. Poorer PF at 16 weeks was associated with higher cancer stage. Age was not a significant predictor of PF at any time point. Using MANCOVA analysis, time had no effect on PF. Nursing Implications: Understanding which patients are most likely to have difficulty with physical functioning facilitates early identification of self care deficits and risks for falls. Patients with higher levels of comorbidity, especially when associated with advanced cancer stage and breast cancer should be assessed carefully for PF needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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