2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160932
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Glycemic Variability Impacts Mood and Quality of Life in Women with Diabetes
Abstract:
Glycemic Variability Impacts Mood and Quality of Life in Women with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Byrn, Mary, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University, Chicago
Contact Address:3950 N. Lakeshore Dr, #1221D, Chicago, IL, 60613, USA
Contact Telephone:773-348-5985
Co-Authors:M. Byrn, S. Penckofer, S. Loftus, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Chicgo, IL; L. Quinn, C. Fritschi, C. Ferrans, Nursing, University of Illinois, Chicgo, IL;
Diabetes is a chronic condition that significantly impacts quality of life (QoL). Poor glycemic control is associated with more diabetes complications, depression, and worse QoL. Glycemic variability provides information about fluctuations in blood glucose within designated time periods. Frequent episodes of hypo- and hyperglycemia can affect mood and well being. The impact of glycemic variability on mood and QoL has not been studied. The Wilson and Cleary Health-Related QoL Framework guided the study as biologic factors, symptoms, and QoL were explored using a descriptive methodology. Twenty three women (52% minority), aged 53, with diabetes for 11 years were studied. They wore a Medtronic continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system for 72 hours with downloadable glucose measures, completed a self-report booklet, and had HBA1c measured. Biologic factors included: (1) glucose control- measured by HBA1c and 24 hour average blood glucose and (2) glycemic variability- measured by 24 hour standard deviation of the glucose readings, continuous overall net glycemic action (CONGA), and Fourier models (statistical model for assessing whole blood glucose profile). Symptoms included: depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), anxiety and anger (Speilberger Scales). The Ferrans and Powers QoL Index assessed QoL. Findings indicated that HBA1c and 24 hour average blood glucose were not associated with quality of life or mood. However, glycemic variability, the 24 hour standard deviation of the glucose readings (r=-.47, p=.033) and the CONGA measures (r=-.46, p=.036 to r=-.55, p=.011) were all significantly associated with health-related QoL. Glycemic variability, using the Fourier models, was significantly associated with depression (r= +.54, p=.012), trait anxiety (r= +.56, p=.008), and quality of life (r= -.66, p=.001). Data suggests that larger glycemic variability is associated with lower quality of life and possible mood alterations. Nursing implications include assessment and education of patients about blood glucose fluctuations as reasons for mood alterations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlycemic Variability Impacts Mood and Quality of Life in Women with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160932-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Glycemic Variability Impacts Mood and Quality of Life in Women with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Byrn, Mary, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University, Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3950 N. Lakeshore Dr, #1221D, Chicago, IL, 60613, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773-348-5985</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mabyrn@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Byrn, S. Penckofer, S. Loftus, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Chicgo, IL; L. Quinn, C. Fritschi, C. Ferrans, Nursing, University of Illinois, Chicgo, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes is a chronic condition that significantly impacts quality of life (QoL). Poor glycemic control is associated with more diabetes complications, depression, and worse QoL. Glycemic variability provides information about fluctuations in blood glucose within designated time periods. Frequent episodes of hypo- and hyperglycemia can affect mood and well being. The impact of glycemic variability on mood and QoL has not been studied. The Wilson and Cleary Health-Related QoL Framework guided the study as biologic factors, symptoms, and QoL were explored using a descriptive methodology. Twenty three women (52% minority), aged 53, with diabetes for 11 years were studied. They wore a Medtronic continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system for 72 hours with downloadable glucose measures, completed a self-report booklet, and had HBA1c measured. Biologic factors included: (1) glucose control- measured by HBA1c and 24 hour average blood glucose and (2) glycemic variability- measured by 24 hour standard deviation of the glucose readings, continuous overall net glycemic action (CONGA), and Fourier models (statistical model for assessing whole blood glucose profile). Symptoms included: depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), anxiety and anger (Speilberger Scales). The Ferrans and Powers QoL Index assessed QoL. Findings indicated that HBA1c and 24 hour average blood glucose were not associated with quality of life or mood. However, glycemic variability, the 24 hour standard deviation of the glucose readings (r=-.47, p=.033) and the CONGA measures (r=-.46, p=.036 to r=-.55, p=.011) were all significantly associated with health-related QoL. Glycemic variability, using the Fourier models, was significantly associated with depression (r= +.54, p=.012), trait anxiety (r= +.56, p=.008), and quality of life (r= -.66, p=.001). Data suggests that larger glycemic variability is associated with lower quality of life and possible mood alterations. Nursing implications include assessment and education of patients about blood glucose fluctuations as reasons for mood alterations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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