The Associations between Physiologic State at Work and Perceived Workload among Female Hospital Nurses Working 12-hour Day Shift

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160934
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Associations between Physiologic State at Work and Perceived Workload among Female Hospital Nurses Working 12-hour Day Shift
Abstract:
The Associations between Physiologic State at Work and Perceived Workload among Female Hospital Nurses Working 12-hour Day Shift
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Chen, Jie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Contact Address:720 Thompson Blvd., Buffalo Grove, IL, 60089, USA
Contact Telephone:859-462-3611
Co-Authors:J. Chen, School of Nursing and Health Studies, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL; L.S. Davis, College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; K.G. Davis, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; W. Pan, Division
Background: Stressful workload has been cited as one of the top reasons for hospital nurses' leaving the profession. Although nursing workload is extensively discussed in the literature, little is known about the impact of these workloads on physiological state among female hospital Registered Nurses (RNs). The Work-Recovery Dynamic Model was developed as a theoretical framework. The first objective of the study was to describe the physiological state at work among female hospital RNs. Energy expenditure (EE), heart rate (HR) and work pace (WP) were chosen as the physiologic parameters. The second objective was to examine the associations between the physiological state and perceived workload. Fatigue was also examined in terms of its contribution to the physiological state. Methods: Demographic and fatigue data were collected through questionnaires from a convenience sample of 145 healthy hospital female RNs. The subjects completed a work diary, and wore a physical activity monitor for one 12-hour day shift to record their HRs and WP, which were used to calculate EE. Correlations, t test, and multiple regression analyses were performed. Results: The average EE for the 12-hour shift was 551.4 +/- 323 kcal, indicating a light intensity level. The average HR of the shift was 96.9 +/- 15.8 bpm. Thirty-six percent of the subjects experienced mean HRs above 100 bpm during the shift, indicating a poor fitness between workload and functional capacity. Nearly 84%, 53% and 45% of the subjects experienced moderate to high level of acute fatigue, insufficient inter-shift recovery, and chronic fatigue, respectively. Perceived workload was found to be significantly predictive of WP intensity but not for EE intensity and HR. Conclusions: Findings indicate a need for collaboration of hospital nursing administrators and staff nurses to address the issues such as staffing plan, work scheduling, and individual factors related to sufficient recovery from fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Associations between Physiologic State at Work and Perceived Workload among Female Hospital Nurses Working 12-hour Day Shiften_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160934-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Associations between Physiologic State at Work and Perceived Workload among Female Hospital Nurses Working 12-hour Day Shift</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Jie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">720 Thompson Blvd., Buffalo Grove, IL, 60089, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">859-462-3611</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jchen2@niu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Chen, School of Nursing and Health Studies, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL; L.S. Davis, College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; K.G. Davis, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; W. Pan, Division </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Stressful workload has been cited as one of the top reasons for hospital nurses' leaving the profession. Although nursing workload is extensively discussed in the literature, little is known about the impact of these workloads on physiological state among female hospital Registered Nurses (RNs). The Work-Recovery Dynamic Model was developed as a theoretical framework. The first objective of the study was to describe the physiological state at work among female hospital RNs. Energy expenditure (EE), heart rate (HR) and work pace (WP) were chosen as the physiologic parameters. The second objective was to examine the associations between the physiological state and perceived workload. Fatigue was also examined in terms of its contribution to the physiological state. Methods: Demographic and fatigue data were collected through questionnaires from a convenience sample of 145 healthy hospital female RNs. The subjects completed a work diary, and wore a physical activity monitor for one 12-hour day shift to record their HRs and WP, which were used to calculate EE. Correlations, t test, and multiple regression analyses were performed. Results: The average EE for the 12-hour shift was 551.4 +/- 323 kcal, indicating a light intensity level. The average HR of the shift was 96.9 +/- 15.8 bpm. Thirty-six percent of the subjects experienced mean HRs above 100 bpm during the shift, indicating a poor fitness between workload and functional capacity. Nearly 84%, 53% and 45% of the subjects experienced moderate to high level of acute fatigue, insufficient inter-shift recovery, and chronic fatigue, respectively. Perceived workload was found to be significantly predictive of WP intensity but not for EE intensity and HR. Conclusions: Findings indicate a need for collaboration of hospital nursing administrators and staff nurses to address the issues such as staffing plan, work scheduling, and individual factors related to sufficient recovery from fatigue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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