The Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160935
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
The Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Chlebowy, Diane, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville School of Nursing
Contact Address:555 South Floyd Street, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:(502) 852-8384
In the United States, African Americans have higher rates of diabetes-related complications, poorer health outcomes, and poorer treatment adherence rates compared to European Americans. Further research is needed to develop optimal behavioral health interventions that address the needs of African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies have reported the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) interventions and the use of the Stages of Change Model (SoCM) in increasing adherence to prescribed treatments among individuals with T2DM. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the effect of a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention on adherence to prescribed treatment regimens (medication use, blood glucose monitoring, physical activity), diabetes markers (glycosylated hemoglobin level, random serum glucose level, body composition), and number of unscheduled health care visits (clinic, emergency department, hospitalizations) among African American adults with T2DM. A convenience sample of 60 African American adults receiving care at an urban outpatient clinic are currently being recruited and randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=30) or the usual care group (n=30). Intervention participants receive 8 MI intervention sessions over a 6 month period with sessions occurring every 2 weeks for months 1-3, monthly for months 4 and 5, and no MI session occurring during month 6. The MI intervention focuses on increasing adherence to treatment regimens and is tailored to match participants' identified stage of change (using the SoCM) for each of the targeted behaviors. Usual care group participants receive the usual care provided at the clinic. Data for outcome measures (adherence to prescribed treatment regimens, diabetes markers, and number of unscheduled health care visits) are being collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months following baseline. Repeated measures ANOVA will be used to determine if the final groups differ on their adherence to prescribed treatments, diabetes markers, and number of unscheduled health care visits over the duration of the study. The study results are pending with data analyses to be completed in December 2009. Knowledge gained from this study will be instrumental in designing further interventions that could potentially improve the lives of African Americans with T2DM. If this model of increasing adherence to prescribed treatment regimens is effective in this population, then it may be applied to the behavioral management of other chronic illnesses in African Americans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160935-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chlebowy, Diane, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">555 South Floyd Street, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(502) 852-8384</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dochle01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the United States, African Americans have higher rates of diabetes-related complications, poorer health outcomes, and poorer treatment adherence rates compared to European Americans. Further research is needed to develop optimal behavioral health interventions that address the needs of African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies have reported the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) interventions and the use of the Stages of Change Model (SoCM) in increasing adherence to prescribed treatments among individuals with T2DM. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the effect of a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention on adherence to prescribed treatment regimens (medication use, blood glucose monitoring, physical activity), diabetes markers (glycosylated hemoglobin level, random serum glucose level, body composition), and number of unscheduled health care visits (clinic, emergency department, hospitalizations) among African American adults with T2DM. A convenience sample of 60 African American adults receiving care at an urban outpatient clinic are currently being recruited and randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=30) or the usual care group (n=30). Intervention participants receive 8 MI intervention sessions over a 6 month period with sessions occurring every 2 weeks for months 1-3, monthly for months 4 and 5, and no MI session occurring during month 6. The MI intervention focuses on increasing adherence to treatment regimens and is tailored to match participants' identified stage of change (using the SoCM) for each of the targeted behaviors. Usual care group participants receive the usual care provided at the clinic. Data for outcome measures (adherence to prescribed treatment regimens, diabetes markers, and number of unscheduled health care visits) are being collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months following baseline. Repeated measures ANOVA will be used to determine if the final groups differ on their adherence to prescribed treatments, diabetes markers, and number of unscheduled health care visits over the duration of the study. The study results are pending with data analyses to be completed in December 2009. Knowledge gained from this study will be instrumental in designing further interventions that could potentially improve the lives of African Americans with T2DM. If this model of increasing adherence to prescribed treatment regimens is effective in this population, then it may be applied to the behavioral management of other chronic illnesses in African Americans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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