Symptoms and quality of life in diverse patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160937
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms and quality of life in diverse patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation
Abstract:
Symptoms and quality of life in diverse patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Cohen, Marlene, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Niedfelt Nursing Research Center
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Rm 5071 College of Nursing, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-5358
Co-Authors:M.Z. Cohen, Adult Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE; C.L. Rozmus, Integrative Nursing Care, University of Texas Health Science Center , Houston, TX; I. Gning, C.S. Cleeland, Symptom Research, University of Texas M
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is both widely used and leads to a variety of severe symptoms. While symptoms and quality of life after HSCT have been examined, none of these studies examined differences among ethnically diverse groups of patients. Data were collected from 164 patients longitudinally at 8 points from pre-transplant to 100 days post-transplant. Most patients, 102 (62%), were white non-Hispanics, 38 (23%) were Hispanic, and 24 (15%) were black non-Hispanics. Symptom severity and its impact were measured using the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory - BMT (MDASI - BMT) while QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for BMT (FACT-BMT). Patients who had allogeneic transplant with myeloablative regimen showed more severe symptoms such as fatigue (p<0.02) and pain (p<.03) and poorer quality of life (p<0.001) across time. Symptom severity was significantly correlated with quality of life across time with correlations ranging from -0.59 to -0.75. Male patients reported fewer of the top five symptoms than female patients (p=0.010). The male patients reported less distress (p=.001), less fatigue (p=0.15), less drowsiness (p=0.018) and a higher quality of life (p=0.049). African American males reported more pain than African American females (p=0.016). Hispanic patients reported fewer problems with sleep (p=0.023), fatigue (p=0.048), and drowsiness (p=0.024) than white non-Hispanic patients. Patients whose functional status was rated as good had fewer of the top five symptoms (p<0.001), less pain (p<0.001), fewer sleep problems (p<0.001), less distress (p<0.001), less fatigue, (p<0.001), less drowsiness (p<0.001), and a higher quality of life (p<0.001). Type of transplant, prepatory regimen, functional status, gender, and ethnicity are important aspects to consider when managing symptoms and quality of life. This information is important for providing patients with anticipatory guidance and support needed during their transplantation experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms and quality of life in diverse patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160937-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptoms and quality of life in diverse patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cohen, Marlene, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Niedfelt Nursing Research Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Rm 5071 College of Nursing, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-5358</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mzcohen@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.Z. Cohen, Adult Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE; C.L. Rozmus, Integrative Nursing Care, University of Texas Health Science Center , Houston, TX; I. Gning, C.S. Cleeland, Symptom Research, University of Texas M</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is both widely used and leads to a variety of severe symptoms. While symptoms and quality of life after HSCT have been examined, none of these studies examined differences among ethnically diverse groups of patients. Data were collected from 164 patients longitudinally at 8 points from pre-transplant to 100 days post-transplant. Most patients, 102 (62%), were white non-Hispanics, 38 (23%) were Hispanic, and 24 (15%) were black non-Hispanics. Symptom severity and its impact were measured using the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory - BMT (MDASI - BMT) while QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for BMT (FACT-BMT). Patients who had allogeneic transplant with myeloablative regimen showed more severe symptoms such as fatigue (p&lt;0.02) and pain (p&lt;.03) and poorer quality of life (p&lt;0.001) across time. Symptom severity was significantly correlated with quality of life across time with correlations ranging from -0.59 to -0.75. Male patients reported fewer of the top five symptoms than female patients (p=0.010). The male patients reported less distress (p=.001), less fatigue (p=0.15), less drowsiness (p=0.018) and a higher quality of life (p=0.049). African American males reported more pain than African American females (p=0.016). Hispanic patients reported fewer problems with sleep (p=0.023), fatigue (p=0.048), and drowsiness (p=0.024) than white non-Hispanic patients. Patients whose functional status was rated as good had fewer of the top five symptoms (p&lt;0.001), less pain (p&lt;0.001), fewer sleep problems (p&lt;0.001), less distress (p&lt;0.001), less fatigue, (p&lt;0.001), less drowsiness (p&lt;0.001), and a higher quality of life (p&lt;0.001). Type of transplant, prepatory regimen, functional status, gender, and ethnicity are important aspects to consider when managing symptoms and quality of life. This information is important for providing patients with anticipatory guidance and support needed during their transplantation experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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