2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160941
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bias in the Choice of Reference Material by Nursing Students
Abstract:
Bias in the Choice of Reference Material by Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Decker, Sally, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saginaw Valley State University
Contact Address:283 Wickes Hall, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI, 48710, USA
Contact Telephone:9899644098
Co-Authors:S.A. Decker, E. Roe, Nursing, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI;
Nursing students are frequently assigned to write papers exploring phenomena important to their discipline. In most undergraduate programs in the US, students have access to electronic search engines to identify material. However, the choice of reference material used in the exploration of these phenomena may be influenced by availability of instant electronic access. From a critical social theory perspective, the knowledge gained by students in their exploration of nursing phenomena may be biased based on the electronic availability of articles, thus over-representing specific journals and authors. The problem to be addressed is: Are the paper references used by nursing students influenced by the electronic availability of supporting articles? If this is found, do those articles represent a bias in the exploration of the literature? Previous studies in library science have identified an increase in the use of electronic journals and decrease in the use of print journals, but have not explored the differences in the source materials obtained in these formats. The method for analysis is that the reference page from phenomenon papers from a baccalaureate nursing class collected over several semesters were reviewed. Papers written on the phenomenon of pain were selected (N=100) due to the wide variety of literature which could be utilized. The references from these papers were analyzed for journal title, article title, date, country of origin of the authors, and availability of the article in full text in CINAHL or other databases. Ten of the "best" articles (strongest evidence, most closely related to health care system of student, and appropriateness for phenomenon) were identified and then compared with the list of references students used. Content analysis is being used for data analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates an over-reliance on full-text CINAHL database material and European authors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBias in the Choice of Reference Material by Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160941-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bias in the Choice of Reference Material by Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Decker, Sally, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saginaw Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">283 Wickes Hall, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI, 48710, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9899644098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">decker@svsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.A. Decker, E. Roe, Nursing, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing students are frequently assigned to write papers exploring phenomena important to their discipline. In most undergraduate programs in the US, students have access to electronic search engines to identify material. However, the choice of reference material used in the exploration of these phenomena may be influenced by availability of instant electronic access. From a critical social theory perspective, the knowledge gained by students in their exploration of nursing phenomena may be biased based on the electronic availability of articles, thus over-representing specific journals and authors. The problem to be addressed is: Are the paper references used by nursing students influenced by the electronic availability of supporting articles? If this is found, do those articles represent a bias in the exploration of the literature? Previous studies in library science have identified an increase in the use of electronic journals and decrease in the use of print journals, but have not explored the differences in the source materials obtained in these formats. The method for analysis is that the reference page from phenomenon papers from a baccalaureate nursing class collected over several semesters were reviewed. Papers written on the phenomenon of pain were selected (N=100) due to the wide variety of literature which could be utilized. The references from these papers were analyzed for journal title, article title, date, country of origin of the authors, and availability of the article in full text in CINAHL or other databases. Ten of the &quot;best&quot; articles (strongest evidence, most closely related to health care system of student, and appropriateness for phenomenon) were identified and then compared with the list of references students used. Content analysis is being used for data analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates an over-reliance on full-text CINAHL database material and European authors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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