2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160943
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Based Maternal Mental Health Screening in an Early Intervention Program
Abstract:
Community-Based Maternal Mental Health Screening in an Early Intervention Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Doering, Jennifer, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1921 E Hartford Ave, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-5716
Co-Authors:J.J. Doering, Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee , Milwaukee, WI; K. Pizur-Barnekow, Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Background: Maternal depression is the most common complication of childbirth affecting 13% of the population. Due to additional social and economic burdens, the sub-population of mothers who have children with special needs may be at even higher risk for poor mental health outcomes, including depression and birth-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Untreated, maternal mental disorders have moderate-severe consequences on child development. Detection of maternal mental health concerns may improve maternal entry into treatment, which may reduce programmatic costs and improve outcomes for children with special needs. Purpose: The purpose of this project was threefold: 1. Examine differences in levels of health literacy and symptoms of depression and PTSD across a sample of urban and suburban/rural mothers who have children with special needs. 2. Adapt existing maternal depression screening best-practice standards for use in a community-based early intervention program. 3. Design mental health education materials specifically for mothers of children with special needs. Methodology: A pilot study examined health literacy levels and symptoms of depression and PTSD in a convenience sample of 25 urban and 25 suburban/rural mothers who had children in an early intervention program. Instruments included the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression, and Perinatal PTSD Questionnaire-II. Findings: Positive screens for maternal mental health symptoms differed significantly across type of county. The percentage of positive screens for depression and PTSD was high. Health literacy was adequate in 98% of the total sample. Intervention: Pilot study results and best-practice recommendations for maternal mental health screening were used to develop a maternal depression screening algorithm and accompanying consumer materials for use within a community-based early intervention program. Summary: Early intervention programs guided by family-centered care models should consider the impact of maternal mental health on child development and implement screening programs to detect maternal mental health concerns.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Based Maternal Mental Health Screening in an Early Intervention Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160943-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community-Based Maternal Mental Health Screening in an Early Intervention Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doering, Jennifer, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1921 E Hartford Ave, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-5716</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">doering@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.J. Doering, Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee , Milwaukee, WI; K. Pizur-Barnekow, Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Maternal depression is the most common complication of childbirth affecting 13% of the population. Due to additional social and economic burdens, the sub-population of mothers who have children with special needs may be at even higher risk for poor mental health outcomes, including depression and birth-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Untreated, maternal mental disorders have moderate-severe consequences on child development. Detection of maternal mental health concerns may improve maternal entry into treatment, which may reduce programmatic costs and improve outcomes for children with special needs. Purpose: The purpose of this project was threefold: 1. Examine differences in levels of health literacy and symptoms of depression and PTSD across a sample of urban and suburban/rural mothers who have children with special needs. 2. Adapt existing maternal depression screening best-practice standards for use in a community-based early intervention program. 3. Design mental health education materials specifically for mothers of children with special needs. Methodology: A pilot study examined health literacy levels and symptoms of depression and PTSD in a convenience sample of 25 urban and 25 suburban/rural mothers who had children in an early intervention program. Instruments included the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression, and Perinatal PTSD Questionnaire-II. Findings: Positive screens for maternal mental health symptoms differed significantly across type of county. The percentage of positive screens for depression and PTSD was high. Health literacy was adequate in 98% of the total sample. Intervention: Pilot study results and best-practice recommendations for maternal mental health screening were used to develop a maternal depression screening algorithm and accompanying consumer materials for use within a community-based early intervention program. Summary: Early intervention programs guided by family-centered care models should consider the impact of maternal mental health on child development and implement screening programs to detect maternal mental health concerns.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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