2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160946
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The use of graphic elicitation and arts-based methods to interview children
Abstract:
The use of graphic elicitation and arts-based methods to interview children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Driessnack, Martha, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:100 Market Street, #309, Des Moines, IA, 50309, USA
Contact Telephone:515-243-7979
Co-Authors:M. Driessnack, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Background: The NIH Initiative, No More Hand-Me-Down Research, emerged over concerns about giving medicines to children that have not been studied or approved for use with children. As with medicines, use of 'hand-me-down', adult-biased approaches may prove misleading or even dangerous. Self-report techniques, such as questionnaires, surveys, and visual analog scales, were developed with/for adults and then adapted for use with children, using simple vocabulary and/or visual prompts, such as smiling faces. However, such 'child-friendly' adaptations do not address the underlying issue - children are not small adults and do not organize and/or retrieve information using the same thought processes or cues that adults do. New approaches to interviewing children that privilege children's thought processes include both graphic elicitation and arts-based methods. Purpose: To describe recent advances in graphic elicitation and arts-based and their integration in research studies conducted with children. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted to examine the integration and success of graphic elicitation and arts-based methods in research studies with children. Results: A kaleidoscope of techniques - including timelines, self portraits, drawing completion tasks, and draw-and-tell conversations - have been used in research and clinical practice to create child-centered and -directed approaches to interviewing children. Specific art materials, directives, and techniques from various research studies are outlined and insights from researchers are shared. Implications: As research shifts from seeking information about children to seeking information from them, there is a critical need to develop and validate new data collection techniques. The continued use of adult-developed and -tested data collection techniques in research involving children continues to call into question the validity of resultant findings. Graphic elicitation and arts-based methods represent techniques that begin with and privilege children's, rather than adult, thought processes. Further, the use of child-centered approaches to interviewing children appears to elicit information about children that is relevant, accurate, and actionable.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe use of graphic elicitation and arts-based methods to interview childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160946-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The use of graphic elicitation and arts-based methods to interview children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Driessnack, Martha, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Market Street, #309, Des Moines, IA, 50309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">515-243-7979</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">martha-driessnack@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Driessnack, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The NIH Initiative, No More Hand-Me-Down Research, emerged over concerns about giving medicines to children that have not been studied or approved for use with children. As with medicines, use of 'hand-me-down', adult-biased approaches may prove misleading or even dangerous. Self-report techniques, such as questionnaires, surveys, and visual analog scales, were developed with/for adults and then adapted for use with children, using simple vocabulary and/or visual prompts, such as smiling faces. However, such 'child-friendly' adaptations do not address the underlying issue - children are not small adults and do not organize and/or retrieve information using the same thought processes or cues that adults do. New approaches to interviewing children that privilege children's thought processes include both graphic elicitation and arts-based methods. Purpose: To describe recent advances in graphic elicitation and arts-based and their integration in research studies conducted with children. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted to examine the integration and success of graphic elicitation and arts-based methods in research studies with children. Results: A kaleidoscope of techniques - including timelines, self portraits, drawing completion tasks, and draw-and-tell conversations - have been used in research and clinical practice to create child-centered and -directed approaches to interviewing children. Specific art materials, directives, and techniques from various research studies are outlined and insights from researchers are shared. Implications: As research shifts from seeking information about children to seeking information from them, there is a critical need to develop and validate new data collection techniques. The continued use of adult-developed and -tested data collection techniques in research involving children continues to call into question the validity of resultant findings. Graphic elicitation and arts-based methods represent techniques that begin with and privilege children's, rather than adult, thought processes. Further, the use of child-centered approaches to interviewing children appears to elicit information about children that is relevant, accurate, and actionable.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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