2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160950
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Impact of Predictive Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes
Abstract:
Family Impact of Predictive Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Friend, Patricia, PhD, APRN, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:2160 S. First Ave., 105-2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:708-216-9553
Co-Authors:P.J. Friend, M.B. Huml, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; L. Bowling, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL;
Genetic discoveries are advancing medicine, particularly cancer care. The ability to identify a genetic predisposition to cancer has prevention, screening, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications. To date, the greatest impact of genetic discovery across the cancer continuum has been in the area of hereditary cancer syndromes; in the ability to predict cancer risk or identify inherited susceptibility to certain cancers through genetic testing. Hereditary cancer risk is inherently a family issue that demands a family systems approach of inquiry and intervention, yet very little research has approached this area from a family perspective. As such, there is an urgent need to better understand the family experience of facing a hereditary increased risk for cancer. This retrospective, descriptive study will employ a convenience sample of individuals that have undergone genetic testing for gene mutation known to be associated with hereditary cancer risk, and their associated family members. This study addresses the family's experience of predictive genetic testing for increased cancer risk. Specific aims are as follows: 1) to describe the family's experience of the testing process; 2) to assess family level of genetic literacy; 3) to assess family functioning, and lastly; 4) to assess satisfaction with the counseling and testing process and ascertain areas for improvement. A semi-structured interview as well as reliable and valid instruments will be used to address the research aims. By knowing the acceptance, utilization and expectations of the cancer genetic testing process by families, as well as the challenges and opportunities for growth faced by families with hereditary cancer syndromes, a comprehensive model of longitudinal, family-centered care can be designed. Goals of care include: to clarify misconceptions about inherited cancer risk, increase genetic literacy, and promote optimal family functioning. Family members that are empowered by knowledge of genetic cancer risk may be more able to modify lifestyle and behavior as needed, engage in recommended cancer surveillance, or avail themselves of prevention options in order to modify cancer risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Impact of Predictive Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160950-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Impact of Predictive Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Friend, Patricia, PhD, APRN, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2160 S. First Ave., 105-2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-216-9553</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pfriend@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.J. Friend, M.B. Huml, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; L. Bowling, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Genetic discoveries are advancing medicine, particularly cancer care. The ability to identify a genetic predisposition to cancer has prevention, screening, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications. To date, the greatest impact of genetic discovery across the cancer continuum has been in the area of hereditary cancer syndromes; in the ability to predict cancer risk or identify inherited susceptibility to certain cancers through genetic testing. Hereditary cancer risk is inherently a family issue that demands a family systems approach of inquiry and intervention, yet very little research has approached this area from a family perspective. As such, there is an urgent need to better understand the family experience of facing a hereditary increased risk for cancer. This retrospective, descriptive study will employ a convenience sample of individuals that have undergone genetic testing for gene mutation known to be associated with hereditary cancer risk, and their associated family members. This study addresses the family's experience of predictive genetic testing for increased cancer risk. Specific aims are as follows: 1) to describe the family's experience of the testing process; 2) to assess family level of genetic literacy; 3) to assess family functioning, and lastly; 4) to assess satisfaction with the counseling and testing process and ascertain areas for improvement. A semi-structured interview as well as reliable and valid instruments will be used to address the research aims. By knowing the acceptance, utilization and expectations of the cancer genetic testing process by families, as well as the challenges and opportunities for growth faced by families with hereditary cancer syndromes, a comprehensive model of longitudinal, family-centered care can be designed. Goals of care include: to clarify misconceptions about inherited cancer risk, increase genetic literacy, and promote optimal family functioning. Family members that are empowered by knowledge of genetic cancer risk may be more able to modify lifestyle and behavior as needed, engage in recommended cancer surveillance, or avail themselves of prevention options in order to modify cancer risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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