The Influence of Neighborhood Environment, Mobility Limitations, and Psychosocial Variables on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160951
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Neighborhood Environment, Mobility Limitations, and Psychosocial Variables on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults.
Abstract:
The Influence of Neighborhood Environment, Mobility Limitations, and Psychosocial Variables on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Gallagher, Nancy, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:1204 West Madison, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA
Contact Telephone:734-663-9492
Co-Authors:N.A. Gallagher, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI; N.A. Gallagher, K.A. Gretebeck, D.L. Ronis, C. Loveland Cherry, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; P.J. Clarke, Institute for Social Research, University
Regular physical activity provides health benefits for healthy aging. Walking is the most common type of physical activity chosen by older adults (OA), often taking place in neighborhoods. Musculoskeletal deficits often limit OA in negotiating their neighborhood environment. Previous research has examined the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations and mobility limitations on walking, but little is known about their combined influence or the additional influence of neighborhood environment on neighborhood walking in OA. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, mobility limitations and neighborhood environment on neighborhood walking in OA. A cross-sectional study was conducted using Social Cognitive Theory as the framework. Surveys were mailed to 400 OA with 326 participating (age range 60-99 years, M =76.1, sd= 8.34). The Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire, Multidimensional Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability, Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale and Self-efficacy scales were used to examine model variables. Hierarchical multiple regression results indicated that demographic characteristics (model 1) accounted for 3.5% of explained variance (p = < .05) in neighborhood walking. The addition of mobility limitations (model 2, R2 = .123, p < .01) and self-efficacy and outcome expectations (model 3, R2 = .207, p < .01) increased the explained variance in neighborhood walking. Lastly, when neighborhood environment was included (model 4), an additional 8.6% of variance was explained (R2 = .293, p < .01). In the final model, self-efficacy had the strongest influence (beta = .464, p < .01) on neighborhood walking followed by the presence of neighborhood destinations within walking distance (beta = .224, p < .01), sex (beta = .144, p < .01), and residential density (beta = .116, p < .05). Although self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of neighborhood walking, neighborhood environment added significantly to the model's explained variance. Further research should examine the relationships between self-efficacy, mobility limitations and neighborhood environment, and these should be considered when designing walking programs for OA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Neighborhood Environment, Mobility Limitations, and Psychosocial Variables on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160951-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Neighborhood Environment, Mobility Limitations, and Psychosocial Variables on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallagher, Nancy, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1204 West Madison, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-663-9492</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">galla169@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.A. Gallagher, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI; N.A. Gallagher, K.A. Gretebeck, D.L. Ronis, C. Loveland Cherry, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; P.J. Clarke, Institute for Social Research, University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Regular physical activity provides health benefits for healthy aging. Walking is the most common type of physical activity chosen by older adults (OA), often taking place in neighborhoods. Musculoskeletal deficits often limit OA in negotiating their neighborhood environment. Previous research has examined the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations and mobility limitations on walking, but little is known about their combined influence or the additional influence of neighborhood environment on neighborhood walking in OA. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, mobility limitations and neighborhood environment on neighborhood walking in OA. A cross-sectional study was conducted using Social Cognitive Theory as the framework. Surveys were mailed to 400 OA with 326 participating (age range 60-99 years, M =76.1, sd= 8.34). The Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire, Multidimensional Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability, Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale and Self-efficacy scales were used to examine model variables. Hierarchical multiple regression results indicated that demographic characteristics (model 1) accounted for 3.5% of explained variance (p = &lt; .05) in neighborhood walking. The addition of mobility limitations (model 2, R2 = .123, p &lt; .01) and self-efficacy and outcome expectations (model 3, R2 = .207, p &lt; .01) increased the explained variance in neighborhood walking. Lastly, when neighborhood environment was included (model 4), an additional 8.6% of variance was explained (R2 = .293, p &lt; .01). In the final model, self-efficacy had the strongest influence (beta = .464, p &lt; .01) on neighborhood walking followed by the presence of neighborhood destinations within walking distance (beta = .224, p &lt; .01), sex (beta = .144, p &lt; .01), and residential density (beta = .116, p &lt; .05). Although self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of neighborhood walking, neighborhood environment added significantly to the model's explained variance. Further research should examine the relationships between self-efficacy, mobility limitations and neighborhood environment, and these should be considered when designing walking programs for OA.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.