Social Determinants of Health and Health Beliefs among African American Women with Chronic Disease and their Decisions to Participate in Genetic Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160956
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Determinants of Health and Health Beliefs among African American Women with Chronic Disease and their Decisions to Participate in Genetic Research
Abstract:
Social Determinants of Health and Health Beliefs among African American Women with Chronic Disease and their Decisions to Participate in Genetic Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Harmon, Carolyn, MSN, ARNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:PO Box 18512, Cleveland Height, OH, 44118, USA
Contact Telephone:216-938-7325
Co-Authors:C.W. Harmon, F.A. Gary, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland, OH;
Background: Advances in genetic knowledge and technology have led to the identification of genes that predispose individuals to chronic diseases. Despite these advances, this science has not yet adequately benefited the health status and longevity of African American women and other minority populations. The lack of racial and ethnic diversity in genetic research severely limits the potential for the advancement of knowledge and understanding about African American women with chronic health conditions. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive/predictive study is to examine the social determinants of health and health beliefs that influence urban African American perimenopausal women (n=109) with chronic health conditions to participate in genetic research. Design Methods: Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted at a variety of settings (e.g., churches, community-based organizations and centers, and worksites) within a 50-mile radius of large universities in a Midwestern city. All research related information, including the informed consent form and the data collection measures, were read aloud to the women. They were asked to follow along with the researcher as the two of them completed the measures. Results/Expected Results: The data analysis will consist of descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of Variance and covariance will be used to analyze the data and make comparisons among the women who agree to participate in genetic research and those who do not. Multiple regression analysis will be used to predict their health outcomes. Conclusion/Conclusions: Implications from this inquiry could help to plan culturally specific interventions that would assist with the advancement of science, reduce mortality and morbidity, and improve well-being among African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Determinants of Health and Health Beliefs among African American Women with Chronic Disease and their Decisions to Participate in Genetic Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160956-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Determinants of Health and Health Beliefs among African American Women with Chronic Disease and their Decisions to Participate in Genetic Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harmon, Carolyn, MSN, ARNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 18512, Cleveland Height, OH, 44118, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-938-7325</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwh11@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.W. Harmon, F.A. Gary, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Advances in genetic knowledge and technology have led to the identification of genes that predispose individuals to chronic diseases. Despite these advances, this science has not yet adequately benefited the health status and longevity of African American women and other minority populations. The lack of racial and ethnic diversity in genetic research severely limits the potential for the advancement of knowledge and understanding about African American women with chronic health conditions. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive/predictive study is to examine the social determinants of health and health beliefs that influence urban African American perimenopausal women (n=109) with chronic health conditions to participate in genetic research. Design Methods: Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted at a variety of settings (e.g., churches, community-based organizations and centers, and worksites) within a 50-mile radius of large universities in a Midwestern city. All research related information, including the informed consent form and the data collection measures, were read aloud to the women. They were asked to follow along with the researcher as the two of them completed the measures. Results/Expected Results: The data analysis will consist of descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of Variance and covariance will be used to analyze the data and make comparisons among the women who agree to participate in genetic research and those who do not. Multiple regression analysis will be used to predict their health outcomes. Conclusion/Conclusions: Implications from this inquiry could help to plan culturally specific interventions that would assist with the advancement of science, reduce mortality and morbidity, and improve well-being among African American women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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